2077

Stylistics of English Language Seminar exercises and tasks

Книга

Иностранные языки, филология и лингвистика

Данное учебное пособие предлагает подробный план семинарских практических занятий по стилистике английского языка. План каждого занятия включает обзор теоретического материала, задания для самостоятельной работы, а также широкий спектр практических заданий, включающих как упражнения, направленные на отработку отдельных языковых навыков, так и развитие творческого письма на английском языке в различных стилях.

Английский

2012-11-11

862.83 KB

177 чел.

МИНИСТЕРСТВО ОБРАЗОВАНИЯ И НАУКИ РОССИЙСКОЙ ФЕДЕРАЦИИ 
 
ФЕДЕРАЛЬНОЕ ГОСУДАРСТВЕННОЕ БЮДЖЕТНОЕ 
ОБРАЗОВАТЕЛЬНОЕ УЧРЕЖДЕНИЕ  
ВЫСШЕГО ПРОФЕССИОНАЛЬНОГО ОБРАЗОВАНИЯ 
«САНКТ-ПЕТЕРБУРГСКИЙ ГОСУДАРСТВЕННЫЙ УНИВЕРСИТЕТ 
ЭКОНОМИКИ И ФИНАНСОВ»  
 
КАФЕДРА ТЕОРИИ ЯЗЫКА И ПЕРЕВОДОВЕДЕНИЯ 
 
 
 

И.Ю. ВОСТРИКОВА 
 
 
 
 

Stylistics of English Language  
 
Seminar exercises and tasks  
 
по дисциплине 
«Стилистика английского языка» 
 
 

Учебное пособие  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

ИЗДАТЕЛЬСТВО  
САНКТ-ПЕТЕРБУРГСКОГО ГОСУДАРСТВЕННОГО УНИВЕРСИТЕТА  
ЭКОНОМИКИ И ФИНАНСОВ 
2011 

 

ББК  81.2Англ 
 

В 78 
 
 
Вострикова И.Ю.  
 
В 78   
Stylistics  of  English  Language.  Seminar  exercises  and  tasks  по 
дисциплине «Стилистика английского языка» : учебное пособие / 
И.Ю. Вострикова. – СПб. : Изд-во СПбГУЭФ, 2011. – 63 с.  
 
Данное  учебное  пособие  предлагает  подробный  план  семинарских 
практических  занятий  по  стилистике  английского  языка.  План  каждого 
занятия  включает  обзор  теоретического  материала,  задания  для 
самостоятельной работы, а также широкий спектр практических заданий, 
включающих  как  упражнения,  направленные  на  отработку  отдельных 
языковых  навыков,  так  и  развитие  творческого  письма  на  английском 
языке в различных стилях. 
Пособие  предназначено  для  студентов-лингвистов  гуманитарных 
факультетов и вузов.  
 
ББК 81.2Англ 
 
 
 
 
 
Рецензенты:  канд. филол. наук, доцент В.Н. Бычков 
 
канд. пед. наук, доцент В.В. Гончарова 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
© СПбГУЭФ, 2011 

 

Contents 
 
Introduction ..................................................................................................  4 
Structure of seminar curriculum and tasks ...................................................  6 
Group presentations .....................................................................................  7 
Exam tasks ...................................................................................................  8 
Topics for term papers .................................................................................  10 
Seminar plans and tasks ...............................................................................  11 
Seminar 1: Concepts of style and main terms of stylistics ...........................  11 
Seminar 2: Intertextuality and interdiscoursivity .........................................  14 
Seminar 3: Tropes, figures and expressive means .......................................  18 
Seminar 4: Metaphors we live by.................................................................  21 
Seminar 5: Publicist style: essays and oratory .............................................  30 
Seminar 6: Newspaper style .........................................................................  34 
Seminar 7: Official documents style ............................................................  39 
Seminar 8: Scientific style ...........................................................................  42 
Seminar 9: Persuasiveness ...........................................................................  44 
Seminar 10: Belle-letters and poetry style ...................................................  49 
Appendix 1 ...................................................................................................  50 
Appendix 2 ...................................................................................................  61 
Literature ......................................................................................................  63 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 









 

Introduction 
 
Stylistics is Linguistic stylistics like other language branches has the 
facts  of  the  language  as  the  main  object  (after  Galperin).  But  it  has  a 
different  subject  of  study  which  is  the  styles  of  speech,  stylistic  means  and 
devices and their correlation to the meaning they are expressing. 
Nowadays stylistics is regarded from various angles but most of scholars 
agree that it is generally applied to such notions as:  
 
Aesthetic functions of the language 
 
Expressive means of the language 
 
Synonymous ways of thought expression 
 
Emotive speech colouring 
 
Stylistic devices  
 
Stratification  of  the  literary  language  into  separate  systems  (speech 
styles) 
 
Individual manner of language usage (idiosyncrasy of a writer).  
Expressive  means  differ  from  the  notion  of  stylistic  devices.  For 
example,  a  lot  of  grammatical  means  are  sometimes  used  for  stylistic 
purposes, like the present continuous tense is used to denote an action in the 
future, or present tenses sometimes imply the facts of the past. But usage of 
these expressive  means does  not create a special stylistic category, they are 
not that frequent and not exactly structured to claim them a stylistic device. 
They are still the facts of grammar, because the grammar aims at describing 
all possible ways of implication of language units. On the contrary, stylistic 
devices are characterized by the deliberate adaptation or editing of language 
facts.  
 
The  central  term  of  stylistics  is  style.  The  term  comes  from  Latin 
‗stilus‘ – a pointed instrument which Romans used to write on wax tablets. 
Later  it  came  to  express  the  manner,  typical  of  a  certain  writer,  then  of  a 
certain author, literary school, some period in the development of literature. 
Then  it  was  carried  to  another  spheres  and  started  to  indicate  the  style  of  a 
painter/composer,  the  elegance  of  technique,  or  that  individual  quality  that 
distinguished the work of this writer from the work of another one. 
The  understanding  of  the  notion  of  style  varied  under  influence  of 
different philosophical schools. With time style obtained a connotation of the 
speech  embellishment  which  leads  to  separation  of  the  form  and  the 
meaning.  Style  was  regarded  as  a  complex  of  technical  devices  used 
independently of the meaning.  
  
A utilitarian point of view suggests style being a system of teaching 
how to speak correctly.   
Others describe style as an individually creative usage of language.  

 

The  most  comprehensive  concept  of  style  introduces  it  as  a  quality 
of speech, a language expression of a thought revealing the natural harmonic 
correlation  between  the  content  and  the  form.  In  this  regard  a  scholar  shall 
distinguish between literature and linguistic concepts of style.  
Academician  Vinogradov  wrote  that  the  content  expressed  by  the 
means  of  literary  language  can  not  be  the  subject  of  linguistic  study.  A 
linguist  is  interested  in  the  methods  of  the  content  expression  or  the 
interrelation of the expressive  means  to the expressed content. However, in 
the  process  of  a  scientific  investigation  the  content  can‘t  be  completely 
ignored either.  
Thus, style can be defined as a socially recognized and functionally 
conditioned  internally  united  complex  of  usage,  selection  and  combination 
means  of  speech  communication  of  any  national  language,  which 
corresponds  to  the  other    similar  means  of  expression  used  for  different 
purposes  in  the  social  speech  practice  of  the  given  nation  (Vinogradov  and 
Galperin).  
 
Another  important  notion  is  functional  style.  А  functional  style  of 
language is а system of interrelated language means which serves а definite 
aim  in  communication.  А  functional  style  is  thus  to  bе  regarded  as  the 
product  of  а  certain  concrete  task  set  bу  the  sender  of  the  message. 
Functional styles арреаг mainly in the literary standard of а language. 
In the English literary standard Galperin distinguishes the following 
major functional styles: 
1) The language of belles-Letters. 
2) The language of publicist literature. 
3) The language of newspapers. 
4) The language of scientific prose. 
5) The language of official documents. 
 
Irina Arnold develops only 4 functional styles:  
1)  Political  
2)  Scientific  
3)  Newspaper 
4)  Colloquial. 
Skrebyshev doesn‘t limit the number of functional styles.  
 
Lapshina offers the following classification:  
1)  Belles-letters style   
2)  Publicist style  
3)  Oratory style 
4)  Scientific style  
5)  Official style 
6)  Newspaper style 






 

7)  Colloquial style.  
A  functional  style  is  a  specifically  arranged  methods  of  usage, 
selection  and  combination  of  language  means  which  can  not  be  confused 
with an individual style of an author.   
 
Functional  styles  are  not  easy  to  distinguish  due  to  the  following 
reasons:  
1)  Functional style interrelate, interweave.  
2)  Functional styles are historically varying.  
3)  The notion of a functional style is very close to that of a genre.  
A  style  can  be  consisted  of  different  genres,  e.g.  the  belles-letters 
style covers the genres of novel, short story, poem etc. Styles are not isolated 
from each other but they have a core and their own special parameters.  
Functional styles are mostly divided into the literary processed styles 
or written styles and the oratory or colloquial styles.  
 
This book contains a thorough seminar plan for stylistics disciplines 
including set of exercises covering all spheres of interest for stylistics, group 
work projects, topics for course papers and exam tasks.   
 
 
Structure of seminar curriculum and tasks 
 
5 following points condition a student‘s admission to the final exam:  
 
1.     Attendance and good work on seminars.  
2.    Compulsory  participation  in  a  group  presentation  (PowerPoint 
format)  on  one  of  the  topics  offered.  These  topics  cover  the  most  urgent 
problems  of  English  stylistics  and  will  definitely  be  introduced  into  exam 
tasks.  
Procedure:  Students  get  united  into  groups  of  two  or  three,  each 
person of which arrange a presentation on the chosen topic. Each member of 
the  group  shall  speak  up.  Each  presentation  should  contain  abundance  of 
examples and illustrations apart from  theoretical  material,  and be concluded 
with a small test of 5 multiple choice tasks on the material presented).  
Students  are  encouraged  to  use  creative  and  illustrative  approach 
while making a presentation. Duration time is about 15 minutes.  
Structure of a presentation
 
Definitions and terms 
 
Main function of a notion described 
 
Main features of a notion described 
 
Examples and illustrations 
 
Small test of 5 multiple choice tasks. 

 

To match the laptop offered by the Chair, please, use the  format of 
PowerPoint  1997-2003.  A  more  modern  version  of  PowerPoint  won‘t  do  at 
our laptop.  
Working language – English.  
3. 
A report or small presentation by every student on a trope or a 
stylistic device on choice.  
4.            All  written  tasks  handed  over  and  graded  by  an  agreed  deadline 
(about 7 written tasks per semester). All written tasks constitute a student’s 
portfolio
 which is to be presented at the exam.  
5.            Term  paper  (kursovaya)  ready  and  handed  over  by  an  agreed 
deadline.  
 
 
Group Presentations 
 
These topics are regarded the principal and most urgent in stylistics 
at the present stage of scientific development:   
1.  Intertextuality  and  interdiscoursivity.  History  of  terms.  Various 
approaches and points of view. Types. Examples. (Seminar 2) 
2.  Tropes,  figures  and  expressive  means.  Differences.  Structure  of  a 
trope.  Transfer  of  meaning  in  tropes.  Classifications  of  devices. 
Examples. (Seminar 3) 
3.  Metaphor. Types, classifications, functions. (Seminar 4) 
4.  Imagery.  Types  of  images.  Interrelation  of  a  trope  and  imagery. 
Structure of an image. Image and symbol. (Seminar 4)  
5.  Specifics of oratory style. (Seminar 5)  
6.  Foregrounding and its main types. (Seminar 5)  
7.  Specifics of newspaper style. (Seminar 6) 
8.  Creolized text. Types, classifications. (Seminar 6) 
9.  Specifics  of  official  documentary:  special  features  of  business, 
military, diplomatic and law substyles. (Seminar 7)  
10.  Specifics of scientific style. (Seminar 8)  
11.  Stylistic  stratification  of  lexis.  Classifications.  What‘s  a  neutral 
layer?  Literary  and  colloquial  strata  (bookish  words,  historisms, 
slang etc) (Seminar 8) 
12.  Persuasiveness.  Types  of  influencing  the  reader  (argumentation, 
manipulation, suggestiveness, NLP). Strategy and tactics. Examples. 
(Seminar 9)  
13.  Specifics  of  English  versification.  Is  there  a  poetic  style?  (Seminar 
10) 
 

 

Tropes and Stylistic Devices to Be Specially Reported Of (individually): 
 
General plan of a report on a trope or a stylistic device:  
1.  Definition 
2.  Structure and functions  
3.  Types, classifications 
4.  Examples and illustrations 
 
List of Tropes and Stylistic Devices: 
1.  Metonymy (including: antonomasia, synecdoche) 
2.  Euphemism and dysphemism 
3.  Epithet  
4.  Irony  
5.  Rhetorical question and other question constructions  
6.  Onomatopoeia and sound symbolism 
7.  Pun, paronomasia  
8.  Paradox 
9.  Oxymoron 
10.  Euphony (alliteration and assonance) and cacophony 
11.  Graphon and other graphic devices 
12.  Parallel constructions  
13.  Hyperbole  
14.   Zeugma  
 
 
Exam Tasks 
 
1.  Stylistics, object of study and objectives. Types of stylistics, field of 
investigation for each type. Differences between types of stylistics.  
2.  Stylistics of decoding. Shennon‘s scheme of communication.  
3.  Varieties  of  language:  spoken  and  written  types.  Features  of  each 
type.  
4.  Different concepts of style. Stylistic function. 
5.  Norm and neutrality.  
6.  Foregrounding and its types. Main functions of foregrounding.  
7.  Intertextuality, history of the term, types of intertextuality. 
8.  Interdiscoursivity, history of the term, main types.  
9.  Context  and  its  types.  Types  of  interrelation  between  word  and 
context.  
10.  Tropes,  stylistic  figures  and  expressive  means.  Differences. 
Examples. 

 

11.  Tropes.  Structure  of  a  trope.  Mechanisms  of  meaning  transfer. 
Classifications of metaphors. Examples of tropes.  
12.  Classifications of stylistic devices. Scientists‘ opinions. Examples of 
phonetic, lexical and grammatical devices.   
13.  Phonetic stylistic devices. Sound instrumenting and its types.  
14.  English  versification.  Verse  organization.  Types  of  rhyme.  Main 
terms.  
15.  Lexical stylistic devices.  
16.  Stylistic  morphology.  Synonymy  of  morphemes  and  variability  of 
morphological categorical forms.  
17.  Stylistic syntax. Models of syntactic devices and their classification. 
Models of reduction and expansion.  
18.  Stylistic syntax. Figures of repetition.  
19.  Stylistic phraseology. Stylistic devices in phraseology.  
20.  Stratification  of  English  vocabulary.  Different  classifications. 
Stylistically marked layers of word-stock. Problem of neutrality.  
21.  Special  colloquial  stratum.  General  characteristics  and  classes  of 
vocabulary. Examples. 
22.  Special  literary  stratum.  General  characteristics  and  word  classes. 
Examples.  
23.  Functional  styles.  Classifications  by  different  scientists.  Basic 
features of functional styles.  
24.  Newspaper  style  and  its  substyles.  Chief  lexical,  grammatical  and 
other characteristics. 
25.  Oratory style. Chief lexical, grammatical and other characteristics. 
26.  Publicist style. Chief lexical, grammatical and other characteristics. 
27.  Official  document  style.  Chief  lexical,  grammatical  and  other 
characteristics. 
28.  Scientific style. Chief lexical, grammatical and other characteristics. 
29.  Emotive  prose  style.  Chief  lexical,  grammatical  and  other 
characteristics. 
30.  Image and imagery. Structure of an image. Classification of images. 
Interrelation between tropes and images.  
31.  Creolized texts. Types, functions and main features. 
32.   Persuasiveness.  Types  of  influencing  the  reader  (argumentation, 
manipulation, suggestiveness, NLP). Strategy and tactics. Examples. 
33.  Text qualities and categories. Category of expressiveness. 
34.  Text qualities and categories. Category of emotiveness.  
 
 
 


 
10 
Topics for Term Papers 
  
Term  papers  are  to  be  performed  in  Russian.  No  more  than  2  students  can 
choose  one  and  the  same  topic,  in  which  case  the  materials  intended  for 
analysis should differ.  
 
1.  Функционирование стилистических приемов в тексте рекламы. 
2.  Стилистические  особенности  построения  креолизованного 
текста комиксов. 
3.  Стилистические приемы персуазивности в тексте политических 
речей. 
4.  Стилистические приемы персуазивности в тексте рекламы. 
5.  Стилистические  приемы  персуазивности  в  публицистике  (на 
материале современных газет и журналов). 
6.  Стилистические 
особенности 
художественного 
текста 
экономической  тематики  (ex:  The  Moneychangers  by  Arthur 
Hailey). 
7.  Стилистические особенности текста художественного фильма. 
8.  Особенности  структуры  жанра  производственного  романа  (на 
материале произведений Артура Хейли). 
9.  Функционирование стилистических приемов в текстах песен.  
10.  Особенности функционирования стилистических фонетических 
приемов в поэзии.  
11.  Интернет-сайт как особый функциональный стиль. 
12.  Стилистические  особенности  написания  заголовков  газет  и 
журналов. 
13.  Функционирование сленга в тексте художественного фильма.  
14.  Особенности  передачи  детской  речи  в  художественной 
литературе. 
15.  Стилистические  особенности  художественных  произведений 
для детей.  
16.  Стилистические  особенности  составления  правовых  документов 
(на материале договоров о приеме на работу). 
17.  Маркеры интертекстуальности в художественной литературе.   
18.  Варианты  проявления  интердискурсивности  в  художественной 
литературе. 
19.  Стилистические  особенности  публицистических  текстов  на 
материале интернет-ресурсов. 
20.  Функционирование  категории  эмотивности  в  художественных 
текстах. 

 
11 
21.  Маркеры  категории  эмотивности  в  текстах  предвыборных 
политических кампаний. 
22.  Аллитерационный  стих  в  творчестве  Дж.Р.  Толкиена  (иного 
поэта). 
23.  Стилистическая конвергенция в детективных романах. 
24.  Типы метафор в политической прессе. 
25.  Классификация  метафор  в  газетных  статьях  экономической 
тематики. 
26.  Стилистические  особенности  построения  креолизованного 
текста политической карикатуры. 
27.  Стилистические особенности английского лимерика.  
28.  Особенности  современного  англоязычного  стихосложения  (на 
материале белого стиха). 
29.  Особенности американского стихосложения в ХХ веке. 
30.  Стилистические особенности лексики интернет-чатов. 
31.  Роль каламбура в английской сатирической прозе.  
32.  Ирония как базовый стилистический прием театральных пьес.  
33.  Типы выдвижения в журнальных редакторских статьях.  
34.  Стилистические особенности текстов военной тематики.  
35.  Стилистические 
функции 
эвфемизмов 
(на 
материале 
политических речей).  
36.  Элементы 
и 
функции 
политической 
корректности 
в 
современной публицистике.   
 
 
Seminar Plans and Tasks  
 
Seminar 1: “Concepts of style and main terms of stylistics” 
 
1.  Introduction.  Demands  to  the  quality  of  a  theoretical  paper, 
discussion  on  the  choice  of  the  topic.  Discussion  on  the  group  and 
individual presentations and choice of topics. 
2.  Stylistics theory:  

Subject  and  aims  of  stylistics.  Speech  stylistics.  Language 
stylistics. 
Pragmalinguistics. 
Stylistics 
of 
decoding. 
Linguostylistics  and  literature  stylistics.  Phonostylistics. 
Morphological 
stylistics. 
Lexical 
stylistics. 
Syntactical 
stylistics. 

Author‘s  and  reader‘s  stylistics  (or  sender  and  recipient 
stylistics).  Stylistics  of  decoding  and  theory  of  information  for 
stylistic purposes.  

 
12 

Various  approaches  to  the  notion  of  style.  Difference  between 
style, genre and text type.  
3.  Practical exercises and homework: synonymous ways of rendering 
one and the same idea.  
Transformation should be made on several levels:  
- using different layers of synonymous lexis; 
- using changes in grammatical constructions; 
- introducing imagery through tropes and stylistic devices to describe the 
given situation.  
 
Exercise  1a:  Analyze  the  transformation  of  the  sentence:  ―Your  letter 
pleased me greatly‖, fulfill the second column of the table describing the 
type of transformation in each case: 
 
1.   I was glad to get your letter 
 
2.   I was pleased by getting your letter 
 
3.   Getting  your  letter  was  a  real  pleasure  for   
me 
4.   Your letter was bear to my taste 
 
5.   Your letter made me jump from joy 
 
6.   Reading your letter was extremely pleasant 
 
7.   To read your epistle was a pure pleasure  
 
8.   Your letter is the best of what happened to   
me lately 
9.   No  words  fail  me  to  describe  happiness  I   
felt, having received your letter 
10.   Your letter flattered me immensely  
 
11.   Your letter gratified me unmistakably  
 
12.   I  can‘t  find  any  radii  to  describe  the  circle   
of the emotions I had, having received your 
letter 
13.   I  cross  heart  that  no  radices  of  the  square   
array  can‘t  calculate  the  pleasure  I  felt 
while reading your letter 
14.   My  joy  of  reading  your  letter  couldn‘t  be   
told in a tale or written with a pen 
15.   You  should  know  what  a  wild  delight   
invaded me when I was reading your letter 
16.   I was reading your letter and believe me my   
eyes  were  full  of  uncontainable  happiness 
and joy 

 
13 
17.   My joy of reading your letter was like sea –   
wide no ho 
18.   Your  letter  elucidated  my  drab  existence   
like a stream of light  
19.   Your letter was like a stream of light in the   
kingdom of darkness  
20.   Your writing to me was the most delightful   
thing possible  
21.   Your letter was as honey for my heart 
 
22.   The  message  you  have  sent  to  me  was   
great! 
23.   Ur msg made me LOL 
 
24.   Your  letter  warms  the  cockles  of  my  heart   
when I re-read it during cold evenings  
25.   I‘ve read your letter and I‘m ready to bend   
my  knee  to  the  God  to  make  him  send  me 
one more message from you 
26.   Thx 4 ur line, it‘s cool 
 
27.   Oh, my friend, your letter 
 
Made my mood go better! 
28.   The  jocundity  I  felt  having  received  your   
epistle was considerable  
29.   Like  rivers  fill  the  sea  with  water,  your   
message filled my soul with pleasure  
30.   Your precious letter … How much it means   
to me 
31.   Not unpleasing was your epistle tome 
 
32.   Did  your  letter  pleased  me?  Oh,  it  really   
did! 
 
Exercise 1b: Are these real transformations? Do you see any flaws while 
transformation in these examples?  
 
33.   Thank you for your letter  
 
34.   Every  time  I  remember  your  letter  I  get   
touched 
35.   As  soon  as  I‘ve  read  your  letter,  a  strong   
desire to answer you overwhelmed me  
36.   

 
14 
Exercise 2: Transfer the following sentences (give at least 30 variants):  
1.  I liked going to the theater last Sunday.  
2.  A pretty girl smiled to me at the railway station. 
3.  Next week our family will go to Paris to visit friends.  
4.  China  is  a  modern  and  rapidly  growing  economy  in  the  post-crisis 
period. 
5.  Thank you for your pleasant gift for my birthday.  
 
 
Seminar 2 “Intertextuality and interdiscoursivity” 
 
1.  Group presentation ―Intertextuality and interdiscoursivity. History 
of terms. Various approaches and points of view. Types. Examples.‖ 
2.  Stylistics  theory: 

Text,  different  views  on  text  in  stylistics.  Properties  and 
characteristics of text.  

Context. Types of context. Interrelation of a word and context.  

Stylistic function.  
3.  Practical  exercises:  make  up  an  interdiscoursive  text.  In  this  case 
we understand interdiscoursivity as interpenetration and interrelation 
of  styles  and  genres,  a  special  case  of  stylization  (e.g.  a  wedding 
invitation  in  the  shape  of  a  newspaper  article  or  a  car  race 
announcement; political fairy-tale; political sermon etc).  
4.  Homework: make up an intertextual dialog using the main markers 
of  manifest  intertextuality  (quotes,  allusions,  footnotes,  references, 
antonomasia  etc).  Mind  that  these  quotes  and  allusions  should  be 
recognizable,  otherwise,  none  will  ever  get  that  this  is  a  quote  and 
this is a case of intertextuality. Dialog size - 20 lines. 
 
Exercise 1: Example of an intertextual dialog (by Alina Bolshakova, 2010):  
 

Hi,  Steven!  What‘s  wrong  with  you?  You  look  like  Luke 
Skywalker1
 after one of those epic cosmic battles.  

Why? Is it that obvious I‘m disappointed?  

Your face, my thane, is as a book where men may read strange 
matters.2 
 

I‘ve been to ―The Times‖ office trying to get a job. The place was a 
Babylon3 – everyone‘s running in all directions, screaming as if it‘s 
Titanic4 sinking or something. Then there was this Cheshire Cat5 
of  a  man,  grinning  at  me  while  asking  questions.  Harry  Potter6 
would  have  found  Snape’s  7  dungeons  cosy  and  comfortable 

 
15 
compared to  what I have  experienced there.  Naturally, I didn‘t get 
the job. So I decided to go home to Mary, take her out to dine.   

All  you  need  is  love8,  isn‘t  it?  Was  she  disappointed  you  din‘t  get 
the place?  

To  put  it  mildly,  yes.  She  was  like  “hit  the  road,  Jack!”9.  Would 
not listen to me, and I feel this time it‘s actually over.  

Thou  too,  Brutus?10  Cheer  up,  Steven!  No  one  in  the  Earth  is 
worth your tears the one who deserves it will never let you cry.11
  

Well, I guess so. Love is a battlefield12, and I seem to have just lost 
this last battle. OK, I don‘t want to continue this conversation at the 
moment,  so  please,  stop  blowing  holes  in  my  ship13!  Sorry,  don‘t 
be offended by anything I say today.  

Friends  will  be  friends14,  mate,  don‘t  worry.  Maybe,  all  this  is  a 
start of a new life? Who knows what the tide could bring?15 

Thank you! I know it‘s gonna be OK. A man can be destroyed but 
not defeated16.
  

What  are  you  going  to  do  now?  How  about  a  Saturday  night 
fever17
? There will be Tony, and Alice, and Mike in the club. They 
have been long willing to see you. You don‘t show up much.  

No, not tonight, thank you. I‘m going home.  

OK.  But,  Steven,  you  can't  stay  in  your  corner  of  the  forest 
waiting  for  others  to  come  to  you.  You  have  to  go  to  them 
sometimes18
.  

I  will.  But  a  little  bit  later,  when  this  Armageddon19  in  my  life 
settles down.   

So, don‘t forget, you can count on us!  

I  know.  I‘ll  get  by  with  a  little  help  from  my  friends20.  I‘ll  call 
you.  

Take care, Steven! See you.  
 
Keys and references:  

1.  Star Wars.  
2.  William Shakespeare, Macbeth, act 1 scene 5.  
3.  In  the  Hebrew  Bible,  the  name  appears  as 
  (Babel),  interpreted 
by Book of Genesis 11:9.  
4.  Titanic  is  a  1997  American  disaster/romantic/drama  film  directed, 
written,  co-produced,  and  co-edited  by  James  Cameron  about  the 
sinking of the RMS Titanic.  
5.  The  Cheshire  Cat  is  a  fictional  cat  popularised  by  Lewis  Carroll's 
depiction of it in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Known for his 

 
16 
distinctive  mischievous  grin,  the  Cheshire  Cat  has  had  a  notable 
impact on popular culture.  
6.  J. K. Rowling, Harry Potter.  
7.  J. K. Rowling, Harry Potter.  
8.  The Beatles, ―All you need is love‖.  
9.  Ray Charles, ―Hit the Road Jack‖.  
10.  Julius Caesar. ("Et tu, Brute?" (pronounced "Et tu, Bruté?") ("Even 
you,  Brutus?"  or  "And  you,  Brutus?"  or  "You  too,  Brutus?"  or  the 
more linguistically antiquated "Thou too, Brutus?") is a Latin phrase 
often  used  poetically  to  represent  the  last  words  of  Roman  dictator 
Julius  Caesar.  Immortalized  by  Shakespeare's  Julius  Caesar,  the 
quotation  is  widely  used  in  Western  culture  as  an  epitome  of 
betrayal.)  
11.  Gabriel García Márquez, One Hundred Years of Solitude.  
12.  Movie ―From 13 to 30‖, a phrase by Jenna Rink.  
13.  Movie  ―Pirates  of  the  Caribbean:  The  Curse  of  the  Black  Pearl‖,  a 
phrase by Captain Jack Sparrow.  
14.  Queen, ―Friends Will Be Friends‖.  
15.  Movie ―Cast Away‖, a phrase by Chuck Noland.  
16.  Ernest Hemingway, The Old Man and the Sea.  
17.  ―Saturday  Night  Fever‖  is  a  1977  film  starring  John  Travolta  as 
Tony  Manero,  an  immature  young  man  whose  weekends  are  spent 
visiting a local Brooklyn discothèque.  
18.  A.A.Milne , Winnie-the-Pooh.  
19.  The Greek New Testament.  
20.  The Beatles, ―With a Little Help from My Friends‖.  
 
Exercise  2:  Example  of  an  interdiscoursive  exercise.  Make  up  a  text 
representing 
examples 
of 
interdiscoursivity 
(keep 
in 
mind 
that 
interdiscoursivity  reveals  when  two  different  functional  styles  overlap,  for 
example, a CV in the shape of a radio interview, a wedding invitation made 
like a newspaper article or advertisement, a political satire but in the form of 
a fairy-tale). You can invent combinations of your own, they are innumerous. 
The important thing here is that in this combination the reader should easily 
recognize  both  styles.  For  example,  if  you  make  a  CV  in  the  shape  of  an 
advert, I should easily find out that it is not just some advert, or not just a bad 
CV, but really a creatively made CV that uses the textual form of the advert. 
 
Exercise  3:  Analyze  the  intertextual  and  interdiscoursive  features  of  the 
following text (politically correct fairytale): 
- analyze the features of both discourses 

 
17 
- analyze the function of italicized parts 
- analyze the devices and features leading to creation of the humorous effect 
- analyze the general effect and purpose of the text.  
 
James Finn Garner “Little Red Riding Hood” 
(from Politically Correct Bedtime Stories, 
Macmillan Publishing Company, New York) 
 
There once was a young person named Red Riding Hood who lived 
with her mother on the edge of a large wood. One day her mother asked her 
to take a basket of fresh fruit and mineral water to her grandmother‘s house – 
not  because  this  was  womyn‘s  work,  mind  you,  but  because  the  deed  was 
generous  and  helped  engender  a  feeling  of  community.  Furthermore,  here 
grandmother  was  not  sick,  but  rather  was  in  full  physical  and  mental  health 
and was fully capable of taking care of herself as a mature adult.  
So  Red  Riding  Hood  set  off  with  her  basket  through  the  woods. 
Many people believed that  the forest  was a  foreboding and dangerous place 
and never set foot in it. Red Riding Hood, however, was confident enough in 
her  won  budding  sexuality  that  such  obvious  Freudian  imagery  did  not 
intimidate her. 
On the way to Grandma‘s house, Red Riding hood was accosted by 
a wolf, who asked her what was in her basket. She replied, ―Some healthful 
snacks for my grandmother, who is certainly capable of taking care of herself 
as a mature adult.‖ 
The  wolf said, ―You know, my dear, it isn‘t safe for a little girl to 
walk through these woods alone.‖ 
Red  Riding  Hood  said,  ―I  find  your  sexist  remark  offensive  in  the 
extreme,  but  I  will  ignore  it  because  of  your  traditional  status  as  an  outcast 
from  society,  the  stress  of  which  has  caused  you  to  develop  your  won, 
entirely valid, worldview. Now, if you‘ll excuse me, I must be on my way.‖ 
Red Riding Hood  walked on  along the  main path. But, because his 
status  outside  society  had  freed  him  from  slavish  adherence  to  linear, 
Western-style  thought,  the  wolf  know  a  quicker  route  to  Grandma‘s  house. 
He burst into the  house and ate Grandma, an entirely  valid course of action 
for  a  carnivore  such  as  himself.  Then,  unhampered  by  rigid,  traditionalist  
notions  of  what  was  masculine  or  feminine,  he  put  on  Grandma‘s 
nightclothes and crawled into bed.  
Red  Riding  Hood  entered  the  cottage  and  said,  ―Grandma,  I  have 
brought you some fat-free, sodium-free snacks to salute you in your role of a 
wise and nurturing matriarch.‖ 

 
18 
From  the  bed,  the  wolf  said  softly,  ―Come  closer,  child,  so  that  I 
might see you.‖ 
Red Riding Hood said, ―Oh, I forgot you are as optically challenged 
as a bat. Grandma, what big eyes you have!‖ 
―They have seen much, and forgiven much, my dear.‖ 
―Grandma,  what  a  big  nose  you  have  –  only  relatively,  of  course, 
and certainly attractive in its own way.‖ 
 
―It has smelled much, and forgiven much, my dear.‖ 
 
―Grandma, what big teeth you have!‖ 
 
The  wolf  said,  ―I  am  happy  with  who  I  am  and  what  I  am,‖  and 
leaped  out  of  bed.  He  grabbed  Red  Riding  Hood  in  his  claws,  intent  on 
devouring  her.  Red  Riding  Hood  screamed,  no  out  of  alarm  at  the  wolf‘s 
apparent tendency toward cross-dressing, but because of his willful invasion 
of her personal space. 
 
Her  screams  were  heard  by  a  passing  woodchopper-person  (or  log-
fuel technician, as he preferred to be called). When he burst into the cottage, 
he saw the melee and tried to intervene. But as he raised his ax, Red Riding 
Hood and the wolf both stopped. 
 
―And  just  what  do  you  think  you‘re  doing?‖  asked  Red  Riding 
Hood.  
 
The woodchopper-person blinked and tried to answer, but no words 
came to him.  
 
―Bursting  in  here  like  a  Neanderthal,  trusting  your  weapon  to  do 
your  thinking  for  you!‖  she  exclaimed.  ―Sexist!  Speciesist!  How  dare  you 
assume  that  womyn  and  wolves  can‘t  solve  their  own  problems  without  a 
man‘s help!‖ 
 
When she heard Red Riding Hood‘s impassioned speech, Grandma 
jumped  out  of  the  wolf‘s  mouth,  seized  the  woodchopper-person‘s  ax,  and 
cut his head off. After this ordeal, Red Riding Hood, Grandma, and the wolf 
felt a certain commonality of purpose. They decided to set up an alternative 
household based on  mutual respect and cooperation, and they lived together 
in the woods happily ever after.  
 
Exercise 4: DKNY case (slides at class).  
 
 
Seminar 3: “Tropes, figures and expressive means” 
 
1.  Group presentations ―Tropes, figures and expressive means.‖   
2.  Stylistics theory:  
- Definitions. Differences between tropes, figures and expressive means. 

 
19 
- Types of tropes.  
- Structure of a trope. Transfer of meaning in tropes. Examples. 
- Analysis of a trope.  
3.  Practical exercises: Exercise on a trope analysis. Define what trope 
(metaphor,  simile,  synecdoche,  antonomasia,  metonymy)  it  is  and 
make an analysis:  
- level of nomination,  
- level of trope structure,  
- level of interdiscoursivity.  
4.  Homework: Exercises 2, 5 and 6 (yellow textbook). Trope analysis.  
 
Exercise 1:  Example of a comprehensive analysis of a trope. 
 
Iron Curtain  

1.  From the point of view of nomination:  
There are 2 levels of nomination – primary and secondary. Metaphor 
always  carries  2  senses  and  is  based  on  the  transfer  of  meaning  between 
them.  
The  level  of  primary  nomination  (initial  meanings  of  words  in  a 
trope):  iron  –  a  neutral  word,  primary  meaning  nominates  a  metal,  but  its 
connotation  brings  the  meaning  of  something  heavy,  non-transparent; 
curtain – a word of neutral level defining a piece of tissue used for covering 
or separating something.  
The  level  of  secondary  nomination  (new  meaning  emerged  in  a 
trope): Neutral words iron and curtain being combined together make up a 
new  meaning  of  a  heavy,  unfriendly  and  impenetrable  wall  or  cover.  We 
know the sphere of application of this word combination which is politics, as 
well as we know the author of it – Winston Churchill, British prime-minister 
after  the  II  World  War.  He  used  this  word  combination  as  a  metaphorical 
definition for hard and foe-likely relations between western democratic states 
and  eastern  communist  countries.  The  visual  symbol  of  the  iron  curtain 
became the Berlin Wall.  
2.  From the point of view of a trope structure (after I.V. Arnold): 
Structure of a trope:  

the tenor 

the vehicle  

ground of comparison 

technique of comparison  

grammatical  and  lexical  specifics  of  comparison  (junctions 
etc.).   

 
20 
We should know the larger context for analysis of this kind – what is 
compared to what.  
Cold,  unfriendly  relations  and  division  of  the  world  into  two 
ideological camps are compared to an iron curtain.  
The  ground  –  heaviness  of  both  notions  (unfriendly  relations  and 
heaviness of iron) 
The  technique  –  similarity  (metaphor  is  a  comparison  and  meaning 
transfer by similarity) 
The tenor is political relations between countries. 
The vehicle is the image of ―iron curtain‖. 
No special grammatical or lexical means are used (in cases of simile, 
for  example,  we  often  use  junctions  ―like‖  or  ―as‖;  if  it  is  so,  you  should 
mention it in your analysis).  
3.  From the point of view of interdiscoursivity:  
The phrase ―iron curtain‖ first emerged in a political speech and then 
was  fixed  in  it.  This  gives  us  the  right  to  define  it  as  a  unit  of  political 
discourse. Moreover, the attribute  ―iron‖ really derives from the description 
of  the  political  situation.  However,  the  symbol  of  curtain  separating  two 
worlds comes from theatrical sphere where a curtain is to divide the audience 
hall from the stage. Thus, we may speak of two discoursed represented in the 
metaphor – interrelation of a political and theatrical discourses.  
 
While writing an analysis, you are advised to use introductive words 
like  ―furthermore,  however, thus,  moreover, then‖  etc. These  words  help to 
connect your ideas in the text and make your analysis look more scientific. 
 
Exercise 2: Define the type of a trope and analyze it:  
1. The suits on Wall Street walked off with most of our savings. 
2.    "I  told  you  we  could  count  on  Mr.  Old-Time  Rock  and  Roll!"  (Murray 
referring to Arthur in Velvet Goldmine) 
3. "I'm a myth. I'm Beowulf. I'm Grendel." (Karl Rove) 
4. General Motors announced cutbacks. 
5.  "He  was  like  a  cock  who  thought  the  sun  had  risen  to  hear  him  crow." 
(George Eliot, Adam Bede) 
6. "Life is like an onion: You peel it off one layer at a time, and sometimes 
you weep." (Carl Sandburg) 
7. "It  is  all,  God  help  us,  a  matter  of  rocks.  The  rocks  shape  life  like  hands 
around  swelling  dough."  (Annie  Dillard,  "Life  on  the  Rocks:  The 
Galápagos") 
8. "Good coffee is like friendship: rich and warm and strong." (slogan of Pan-
American Coffee Bureau) 

 
21 
9.  "The  streets  were  a  furnace,  the  sun  an  executioner."  (Cynthia  Ozick, 
"Rosa") 
10.  "But  my  heart  is  a  lonely  hunter  that  hunts  on  a  lonely  hill."  (William 
Sharp, "The Lonely Hunter"). 
 
 
Seminar 4: “Metaphors we live by” 
 
1.  Group presentation ―Metaphor as the main trope.‖ 
2.  Stylistics theory:  
- Metaphor as the main trope, general definitions, various views.  
- Structure, mechanisms of meaning transfer. 
- Classification of metaphors. 
- Main functions.  
3.  Practical  exercises  and  homework:  Read  the  article  by  George 
Lakoff and Mark Johnson
 ―Metaphors we live by‖.  Discussion, make 
up a summary with the main ideas. 
 
Exercise  1:  In  Metaphors  We  Live  By  George  Lakoff,  a  linguist, 
and Mark Johnson, a philosopher, suggest that metaphors not only make our 
thoughts  more  vivid  and  interesting  but  that  they  actually  structure  our 
perceptions  and  understanding.  Thinking  of  marriage  as  a  "contract 
agreement," for example, leads to one set of expectations, while thinking of it 
as "team play," "a negotiated settlement," "Russian roulette," "an indissoluble 
merger," or "a religious sacrament"  will carry different  sets of expectations. 
When a government thinks of its enemies as "turkeys‖ or "clowns" it does not 
take  them  as  serious  threats,  but  if  they  are  "pawns"  in  the  hands  of  the 
communists, they are taken seriously indeed. 
Metaphors We Live By has led many readers to a new recognition of 
how profoundly metaphors not only shape our view of life in the present but 
set up the expectations that determine what life well be for us in the future.  
 
"Metaphors We Live By" by George Lakoff and Mark Johnson (1980) 
(the selection comprises chapters 1, 2, 3, and part of 4). 
 
Concepts we live by 
Metaphor is for most people device of the poetic imagination and the 
rhetorical  flourish--a  matter  of  extraordinary  rather  than  ordinary  language. 
Moreover, metaphor is typically viewed as characteristic of language alone, a 
matter  of  words  rather  than  thought  or  action.  For  this  reason,  most  people 
think they can get along perfectly well without metaphor. We have found, on 

 
22 
the contrary, that metaphor is pervasive in everyday life, not just in language 
but in thought and action. Our ordinary conceptual system, in terms of which 
we both think and act, is fundamentally metaphorical in nature. 
The  concepts  that  govern  our  thought  are  not  just  matters  of  the 
intellect.  They  also  govern  our  everyday  functioning,  down  to  the  most 
mundane  details.  Our  concepts  structure  what  we  perceive,  how  we  get 
around  in  the  world,  and  how  we  relate  to  other  people.  Our  conceptual 
system thus plays a central role in defining our everyday realities. If  we are 
right  in  suggesting  that  our  conceptual  system  is  largely  metaphorical,  then 
the  way  we  thinks  what  we  experience,  and  what  we  do  every  day  is  very 
much a matter of metaphor. 
But our conceptual system is not something we are normally aware 
of. in most of the little things we do every day, we simply think and act more 
or  less  automatically  along  certain  lines.  Just  what  these  lines  are  is  by  no 
means  obvious.  One  way  to  find  out  is  by  looking  at  language.  Since 
communication  is  based  on  the  same  conceptual  system  that  we  use  in 
thinking  and  acting,  language  is  an  important  source  of  evidence  for  what 
that system is like. 
Primarily  on  the  basis  of  linguistic  evidence,  we  have  found  that 
most  of  our  ordinary  conceptual  system  is  metaphorical  in  nature.  And  we 
have  found  a  way  to  begin  to  identify  in  detail  just  what  the  metaphors  are 
halt structure how we perceive, how we think, and what we do. 
To  give  some  idea  of  what  it  could  mean  for  a  concept  to  be 
metaphorical and for such a concept to structure an everyday activity, let us 
start  with  the  concept  ARGUMENT  and  the  conceptual  metaphor 
ARGUMENT IS WAR. This metaphor is reflected in our everyday language 
by a wide variety of expressions: 
ARGUMENT IS WAR 
Your claims are indefensible. 
He attacked every weak point in my argument. 
His criticisms were right on target. 
demolished his argument. 
I've never won an argument with him. 
you disagree? Okay, shoot! 
If you use that strategy, he'll wipe you out. 
He shot down all of my arguments. 
It is important to see that we don't just talk about arguments in terms of… 
It is important to see that we don't just talk about arguments in terms 
of  war.  We  can  actually  win  or  lose  arguments.  We  see  the  person  we  are 
arguing with as an opponent. We attack his positions and we defend our own. 
We  gain  and  lose  ground.  We  plan  and  use  strategies.  If  we  find  a  position 

 
23 
indefensible,  we  can  abandon  it  and  take  a  new  line  of  attack.  Many  of  the 
things  we  do  in  arguing  are  partially  structured  by  the  concept  of  war. 
Though there is no physical battle, there is a verbal battle, and the structure of 
an argument – attack, defense, counter-attack, etc. – reflects this. It is in this 
sense that the ARGUMENT IS WAR metaphor is one that we live by in this 
culture;  its  structures  the  actions  we  perform  in  arguing.  Try  to  imagine  a 
culture where arguments are not viewed in terms of war, where no one wins 
or loses, where there is no sense of attacking or defending, gaining or losing 
ground.  Imagine  a  culture  where  an  argument  is  viewed  as  a  dance,  the 
participants are seen as performers, and the goal is to perform in a balanced 
and  aesthetically  pleasing  way.  In  such  a  culture,  people  would  view 
arguments  differently,  experience  them  differently,  carry  them  out 
differently, and talk about them differently. But we would probably not view 
them  as  arguing  at  all:  they  would  simply  be  doing  something  different.  It 
would seem strange even to call what they were doing "arguing." In perhaps 
the  most neutral  way of describing this difference between  their culture and 
ours  would  be  to  say  that  we  have  a  discourse  form  structured  in  terms  of 
battle and they have one structured in terms of dance. This is an example of 
what it means for a metaphorical concept, namely, ARGUMENT IS WAR, to 
structure  (at  least  in  part)  what  we  do  and  how  we  understand  what  we  are 
doing  when  we  argue.  The  essence  of  metaphor  is  understanding  and 
experiencing one kind of thing in terms of another.
. It is not that arguments 
are a subspecies of war. Arguments and wars are different kinds of things  – 
verbal discourse and armed conflict – and the actions performed are different 
kinds  of  actions.  But  ARGUMENT  is  partially  structured,  understood, 
performed, and talked about in terms of WAR. The concept is metaphorically 
structured,  the  activity  is  metaphorically  structured,  and,  consequently,  the 
language is metaphorically structured. 
Moreover,  this  is  the  ordinary  way  of  having  an  argument  and 
talking about one. The normal way for us to talk about attacking a position is 
to use the words "attack a position." Our conventional ways of talking about 
arguments  presuppose  a  metaphor  we  are  hardly  ever  conscious  of.  The 
metaphors  not  merely  in  the  words  we  use  –  it  is  in  our  very  concept  of  an 
argument. The language of argument is not poetic, fanciful, or rhetorical; it is 
literal. We talk about arguments that way because  we conceive of them that 
way – and we act according to the way we conceive of things. 
The  most  important  claim  we  have  made  so  far  is  that  metaphor  is 
not just a matter of language, that is, of mere words. We shall argue that, on 
the contrary, human thought processes are largely metaphorical. This is what 
we  mean  when  we  say  that  the  human  conceptual  system  is  metaphorically 
structured  and  defined.  Metaphors  as  linguistic  expressions  are  possible 

 
24 
precisely  because  there  are  metaphors  in  a  person's  conceptual  system. 
Therefore,  whenever  in  this  book  we  speak  of  metaphors,  such  as 
ARGUMENT  IS  WAR,  it  should  be  understood  that  metaphor  means 
metaphorical concept. 
The systematicity of metaphorical concepts 
Arguments  usually  follow  patterns;  that  is,  there  are  certain  things 
we  typically  do  and  do  not  do  in  arguing.  The  fact  that  we  in  part 
conceptualize  arguments  in  terms  of  battle  systematically  influences  the 
shape  argument  stake  and  the  way  we  talk  about  what  we  do  in  arguing. 
Because the metaphorical concept is systematic, the language we use to talk 
about that aspect of the concept is systematic. 
We  saw  in  the  ARGUMENT  IS  WAR  metaphor  that  expressions 
from the vocabulary of war, e.g., attack a position, indefensible, strategy, new 
line of attack, win, gain ground, etc., form a systematic way of talking about 
the battling aspects of arguing. It is no accident that these expressions mean 
what they mean when we use them to talk about arguments. A portion of the 
conceptual  network  of  battle  partially  characterizes  file  concept  of  an 
argument,  and  the  language  follows  suit.  Since  metaphorical  expressions  in 
our  language  are  tied  to  metaphorical  concepts  in  a  systematic  way,  we  can 
use  metaphorical  linguistic  expressions  to  study  the  nature  of  metaphorical 
concepts  and  to  gain  an  understanding  of  the  metaphorical  nature  of  our 
activities. 
To  get  an  idea  of  how  metaphorical  expressions  in  everyday 
language  icon  give  us  insight  into  the  metaphorical  nature  of  the  concepts 
that  structure  our  everyday  activities,  let  us  consider  the  metaphorical 
concept TIME IS Money as it is reflected in contemporary English. 
TIME IS MONEY 
You're wasting my time. 
This gadget will save you hours. I don't have the time to give you. 
How do you spend your time these days? That flat tire cost me an hour. 
I've invested a lot of time in her. 
1 don't have enough time to spare for that. You're running out of time. 
You need to budget your time. 
Put aside aside some time for ping pong. 
Is that worth your while? 
Do you have much time left
He's living on I borrowed time. 
You don't use your time, profitably
lost a lot of time when I got sick. 
Thank you for your time. 

 
25 
Time in our culture is a valuable commodity. It is a limited resource 
that we use to accomplish our goals. Because of the way that the concept of 
work  has  developed  in  modern  Western  culture,  where  work  is  typically 
associated  with  the  time  it  takes  and  time  is  precisely  quantified,  it  has 
become  customary  to  pay  people  by  the  hour,  week,  or  year.  In  our  culture 
TIME  IS  MONEY  in  many  ways:  telephone  message  units,  hourly  wages, 
hotel  room  rates,  yearly  budgets,  interest  on  loans,  and  paying  your  debt  to 
society by "serving time." These practices are relatively new in the history of 
the  human  race,  and  by  no  means  do  they  exist  in  all  cultures.  They  have 
arisen  in  modern  industrialized  societies  and  structure  our  basic  everyday 
activities in a very profound way. Corresponding to the  fact that we act as if 
time is a valuable commodity--a limited resource, even money--we conceive 
of  time  that  way.  Thus  we  understand  and  experience  time  as  the  kind  of 
thing  that  can  be  spent,  wasted,  budgeted,  invested  wisely  or  poorly,  saved, 
or squandered. 
TIME IS MONEY, TIME IS A LIMITED RESOURCE, and TIME 
IS  A  VALUABLE  COMMODITY  are  all  metaphorical  concepts.  They  are 
metaphorical  since  we  are  using  our  everyday  experiences  with  money, 
limited resources, and valuable commodities to conceptualize time. This isn't 
a  necessary  way  for  human  beings  to  conceptualize  time;  it  is  tied  to  our 
culture. There are cultures where time is none of these things. 
The  metaphorical  concepts  TIME  IS  MONEY,  TIME  1S  A 
RESOURCE,  and  TIME  IS  A  VALUABLE  COMMODITY  form  a  single 
system  based  on  sub-categorization,  since  in  our  society  money  is  a  limited 
resource  and  limited  resources  are  valuable  commodities.  These  sub 
categorization relationships characterize entailment relationships between the 
metaphors:  TIME  IS  MONEY  entails  that  TIME  IS  A  LIMITED 
RESOURCE, which entails that TIME 1S A VALUABLE COMMODITY. 
We are adopting the practice of using the most specific metaphorical 
concept, in this case TIME IS MONEY to characterize the entire system. Of 
the  expressions  listed  under  the  TIME  IS  MONEY  metaphor,  some  refer 
specifically to money (spend, invest, budget, probably cost), others to limited 
resources  (use,  use  up,  have  enough  of,  run  out  of),  and  still  others  to 
valuable commodities (have, give, lose, thank you for). This is an example of 
the  way  in  which  metaphorical  entailments  can  characterize  a  coherent 
system  of  metaphorical  concepts  and  a  corresponding  coherent  system  of 
metaphorical expressions for those concepts. 
The very systematicity that allows us to comprehend one aspect of a 
concept in terms terms of another (e.g., comprehending an aspect of arguing 
in  terms  of  battle)  will  necessarily  hide  other  aspects  of  the  concept.  In 
allowing us to focus on one aspect of a concept (e.g., the battling aspects of 

 
26 
arguing), metaphorical concept can keep us from focusing on other aspects of 
the  concept  that  are  inconsistent  with  that  metaphor.  For  example,  in  the 
midst of a heated argument, when we are intent on attacking our opponent's 
position and defending our own, we may lose sight of the cooperative aspects 
of  arguing.  Someone  who  is  arguing  with  you  can  be  viewed  as  giving  you 
his  time,  a  valuable  commodity,  in  an  effort  at  mutual  understanding.  But 
when  we  are  preoccupied  with  the  battle  aspects,  we  often  lose  sight  of  the 
cooperative aspects. 
A  far  more  subtle  case  of  how  a  metaphorical  concept  can  hide  an 
aspect  of  our  experience  can  be  seen  in  what  Michael  Reddy  has  called  the 
"conduit  metaphor."'  Reddy  observes  that  our  language  about  language  is 
structured roughly by the following complex metaphor: 
IDEAS (Of MEANINGS) ARE OBJECTS. 
LINGUISTIC EXPRESSIONS ARE CONTAINERS. 
COMMUNICATION IS SENDING. 
The  speaker  puts  ideas  (objects)  into  words  (containers)  and  sends 
them  (along  a  conduit)  to  a  bearer  who  takes  the  idea/objects  out  of  the 
word/containers.  Reddy  documents  this  with  more  than  a  hundred  types  of 
expressions in English, which he estimates account for at least 70 percent of 
the expressions we use for talking about language. Here are some examples: 
THE CONDUIT METAPHOR 
It's hard to get that idea across to him. 
gave you that idea. 
Your reasons came through to us. 
It's difficult to put my ideas into words. 
When you have a good idea, try to capture it immediately in words. 
Try to pack more thought into fewer words. 
You can't simply stuff ideas into a sentence any old way. 
The meaning is right there in the words. 
Don't force your meanings into the wrong words. 
His words carry little meaning. 
The introduction has a great deal of thought content. 
Your words seem hollow. 
The sentence is without meaning. 
The idea is buried in terribly dense paragraphs. 
In  examples  like  these  it  is  far  more  difficult  to  see  that  there  is 
anything hidden by the metaphor or even to see that there is a metaphor here 
at all. This is so much the conventional way of thinking about language that it 
is  sometimes  hard  to  imagine  that  it  might  not  fit  reality.  But  if  we  look  at 
what the conduit metaphor entails, we can see some of the ways in which it 
masks aspects of the communicative process. 

 
27 
First,  the  Linguistic  EXPRESSIONS  ARE  CONTAINERS  FOR 
MEANINGS aspect of the conduit metaphor entails that words and sentences 
have  meanings  in  themselves,  independent  of  any  context  or  speaker.  The 
MEANINGS ARE OBJECTS part of the metaphor, for example, entails that 
meanings have an existence independent of people and contexts. The part of 
the metaphor that says LINGUISTICS EXPRESSIONS ARE CONTAINERS 
FOR  MEANING  entails  that  words  (and  sentences)  have  meanings,  again 
independent  of  contexts  and  speakers.  These  metaphors  are  appropriate  in 
many  situations--those  where  context  differences  don't  matter  and  where  all 
the participants in the conversation understand the sentences in the same way. 
These two entailments are exemplified by sentences like 
―The meaning is right there in the words‖, 
which,  according  to  the  CONDUIT  metaphor,  can  correctly  be  said  of  any 
sentence.  But  there  are  many  cases  where  context  does  matter.  Here  is  a 
celebrated one recorded in actual conversation by Pamela Downing: 
―Please sit in the apple-juice seat‖. 
In isolation this sentence has no meaning at all, since the expression 
"apple-juice seat" is not a conventional way of referring to any kind of object. 
But the sentence makes perfect sense in the context in which it was uttered. 
An overnight guest came down  to breakfast. There  were four place settings, 
three with orange juice and one with apple juice. It was clear what the apple-
juice seat was. And even the next morning, when there was no apple juice, it 
was still clear which seat was the apple-juice seat. 
In addition to sentences that have no meaning without context, there 
are  cases  where  a  single  sentence  will  mean  different  things  to  different 
people. Consider: 
―We need new alternative sources of energy‖. 
This  means  something  very  different  to  the  president  of  Mobil  Oil 
from what it means to the president of Friends of the Earth. The meaning is 
not  right  there  in  the  sentence--it  matters  a  lot  who  is  saying  or  listening  to 
the  sentence  and  what  his  social  and  political  attitudes  are.  The  CONDUIT 
metaphor  does  not  fit  cases  where  context  is  required  to  determine  whether 
the sentence has any meaning at all and, if so, what meaning it has. 
These  examples  show  that  the  metaphorical  concepts  we  have 
looked  at  provide  us  with  a  partial  understanding  of  what  communication, 
argument,  and  time  are  and  that,  in  doing  this,  they  hide  other  aspects  of 
these  concepts.  It  is  important  to  see  that  the  metaphorical  structuring 
involved here is partial, not total. If it were total, one concept would actually 
be the other, not merely be understood in terms of it. For example, time isn't 
really  money.  If  you  spend  your  time  trying  to  do  something  and  it  doesn't 
work, you can't get your time back. There are no time banks. I can give you a 

 
28 
lot of time, but  you can't  give  me back  the same  time, though  you can  give 
me back the  same amount of  time.  And  so on. Thus, part of a  metaphorical 
concept does not and cannot fit. 
On  the  other  hand,  metaphorical  concepts  can  be  extended  beyond 
the  range  of  ordinary  literal  ways  of  thinking  and  talking  into  the  range  of 
what  is  called  figurative,  poetic,  colorful,  or  fanciful  thought  and  language. 
Thus,  if  ideas  are  objects,  we  can  dress  them?n  up  in  fancy  clothes,  juggle 
them,  line  them  up  nice  and  neat,  etc.  So  when  we  say  that  a  concept  is 
structured  by  a  metaphors  we  mean  that  it  is  partially  structured  and  that  it 
can be extended in some ways but not others. 
Orientational metaphors  
So  far  we  have  examined  what  we  will  call  structural  metaphors, 
cases where one concept is metaphorically structured in terms of another. But 
there is another kind of metaphorical concept, one that does not structure one 
concept in terms of another but instead organizes a whole system of concepts 
with respect to one another. We will call these orientational metaphors, since 
most of them have to do with spatial orientation: up-down, in-out, front-back, 
on-off, deep-shallow, central-peripheral. These spatial orientations arise from 
the fact that we have bodies of the sort we have and that they function as they 
do  in  our  physical  environment.  Orientational  metaphors  give  a  concept  a 
spatial  orientation;  for  example,  happy  is  up.  The  fact  that  the  concept 
HAPPY  is  oriented  up  leads  to  English  expressions  like  "I'm  feeling  up 
today." 
Such  metaphorical  orientations  are  not  arbitrary.  They  have  a  basis 
in  our  physical  and  cultural  experience.  Though  the  polar  oppositions  up-
down,in-out, etc., are physical in nature, the orientational metaphors based on 
them vary from culture to culture. For example, in some cultures the future is 
in front of us, whereas in others it is in back. We will be looking at up-down 
spatialization  metaphors,  which  have  been  studied  intensively  by  William 
Nagy,  as  an  illustration.  In  each  case,  we  will  give  a  brief  hint  about  how 
such  metaphorical concept might  have arisen from our physical and cultural 
experience.  These  accounts  are  mean,  to  be  suggestive  and  plausible,  not 
definitive. 
HAPPY IS UP; SAD IS DOWN. 
I'm feeling up. That boosted my spirits. My spirits rose. you're in high spirits. 
Thinking about her always  gives  me a lift. I'm  feeling down. I'm depressed. 
He's really low these days. I fell into a depression. My spirits sank. 
physical  basis:  Drooping  Posture  typically  goes  along  with  sadness  and 
depression, erect posture with a positive emotional state. 
CONSCIOUS IS UP; UNCONSCIOUS IS DOWN 

 
29 
Wake  up  Wake  up.  I'm  up  already.  He  rises  early  in  the  morning.  He  fell 
asleep.  He  dropped  off  to  sleep.  He's  under  hypnosis.  He's  under  hypnosis. 
He sank into a coma. 
Physical basis: Humans and  most other  mammals sleep lying down 
and stand up when they awaken. 
HEALTH AND LIFE ARE UP 
SICKNESS AND DEATH ARE DOWN 
He's at the peak of health. Lazarus rose from the dead. He's in top shape. As 
to his health, he's way up there. He fell ill. He's sinking fast. He came down 
with the flu. His health is declining. He dropped dead. 
Physical basis: Serious illness forces us to lie down physically. When you're 
dead, you are physically down. 
HAVING CONTROL OR FORCE IS UP 
BEING SUBJECT TO CONTROL OR FORCE IS DOWN 
I  have  control  over  her.  I  am  on  top  of  the  situation.  He's  in  a  superior 
position. He's at the height of his power. He's in the high command. He's in 
the  upper  echelon.  His  power  rose.  He  ranks  above  me  in  strength.  He  is 
under my control. He fell from power. His Power is on the decline. He is my 
social interior. He is low man on the totem pole. 
Physical  basis-  Physical  size  typically  correlates  with  physical  strength,  and 
the victor in a fight is typically on top. 
MORE IS UP; LESS 1S DOWN 
The number of books printed each year keeps going up. His draft number is 
high.  My  income  rose  last  year.  The  amount  of  artistic  activity  in  this  state 
has gone down in the past year. The number of errors he made is incredibly 
low. His income fell last year. He is underage. If you're 100 hot, turn the heat 
down. 
Physical  basis:  If  you  add  more  of  a  substance  or  of  physical  objects  to  a 
container or pile, the level goes up. 
FORESEEABLE FUTURE EVENTS ARE UP (AND AHEAD) 
All upcoming events are listed in the paper. What's coming up this week? I'm 
afraid of what's up ahead of us. What's up? 
Physical basis: Normally our eyes look in the direction in which we typically 
move  (ahead,  forward).  As  an  object  approaches  a  person  (or  the  person 
approaches  the  object),  the  object  appears  larger.  Since  the  ground  is 
perceived as being fixed, the top of the object appears to be moving upward 
in the person's field of vision. 
HIGH STATUS IS UP; LOW STATUS IS DOWN 
He  has  a  lofty  position.  She'll  rise  to  the  top.  He's  at  the  peak  of  his 
career.He's  climbing  the  ladder.  He  has  little  upward  mobility.  He's  at  the 
bottom of the social hierarchy. She fell in status. 

 
30 
Social  and  physical  basis:  Status  is  correlated  with  (social)  power  and 
(physical) power is up. 
GOOD IS UP; BAD IS DOWN 
Things  are  looking  up.  We  hit  a  peak  last  year,  but  it's  been  downhill  ever 
since. Things are at an all-time low. He does high-quality work. 
Physical basis for personal  well-being: Happiness,  health, life, and control--
the things that principally characterize what is good for a person--all are up. 
VIRTUE IS UP; DEPRAVITY IS DOWN 
He  is  high-minded.  She  has  high  standards.  She  is  up  right.  She  is  an  up-
standing  citizen.  That  was  a  low  trick.  Don't  be  underhanded.  I  wouldn't 
stoop to that. That would be beneath me. He fell into the abyss of depravity. 
That was a low-down thing to do. 
Physical  and  social  basis:  GOOD  IS  UP  for  a  person  (physical  basis), 
together  with  SOCIETY  IS  A  PERSON  (in  the  version  where  you  are  not 
identifying with your society). To be virtuous is to act in accordance with the 
standards  set  by  the  society/person  to  maintain  its  well-being.  VIRTUE  IS 
UP  because  virtuous  actions  correlate  with  social  well-being  from  the 
society/person's point of view. Since socially based metaphors are part of the 
culture, it's the society/person's point of view that counts. 
RATIONAL IS UP; EMOTIONAL IS DOWN 
The  discussion  fell  to  the  emotional  level,  but  I  raised  it  back  up  to  the 
rational  plane.  We  put  our  feelings  aside  and  had  a  high-level  intellectual 
discussion of the matter. He couldn't rise above his emotions. 
Physical and cultural basis: In our culture people view themselves as being in 
control  over  animals,  plants,  and  their  physical  environment,  and  it  is  their 
unique  ability  to  reason  that  places  human  beings  above  other  animals  and 
gives them this control. CONTROL IS UP thus provides a basis for MAN IS 
UP and therefore RATIONAL IS UP.  
 
 
Seminar 5: “Publicist style: essays and oratory” 
 
1.  Group  presentation  ―Specifics  of  oratory  style‖;  ―Foregrounding 
and its main types‖ 
2.  Stylistics theory:  
- Publicist style and its specific features. 
- Main functions and traits of an essay. 
- Oratory style as a unique genre of the publicist style.  
-  Types,  functions  and  devices  of  foregrounding  and  its  usage  in 
publicist style. 
 




 
31 
3.  Practical exercises:  
 
Detailed  stylistic  analysis  of  the  famous  speech  of  Martin  Luther 
King ―I have a dream‖ according to the analysis scheme. 
 
Try to count all metaphors in the text of M.L. King‘s speech ―I have 
a  dream‖.  Give  a  brief  analysis  of  each  metaphor  (tenor,  vehicle, 
ground, types of discourses present). 
 
Foregrounding practice.   
4.  Homework:  Make  a  thorough  comparison  of  two  prominent 
speeches  of  American  rhetoric:  Martin  Luther  King‘s  ―I  have  a 
dream‖  and Barack Obama‘s  ―Yes. We. Can‖. The  classic  stylistic 
analysis  scheme  including  stylistic  analysis,  beauty  of  language 
(tropes,  lexis,  syntax)  should  be  accomplished  with  such  important 
aspects as tactics of influencing the audience, extralinguistic context 
- historical background, results of both speeches and their impact on 
the future. 
 
Exercise 1: Scheme of extended stylistic analysis:  
 
1.  Start  by  responding  to  the  text.  Don‘t  comment  on  features  that 
are  missing  unless  there  is  a  significant  comment  to  make.  Don‘t  try  to 
include everything, comment on the most significant aspects of the text. Read 
the  text  carefully,  think,  brainstorm  and  decide  on  the  best  order  for  your 
points. You are aiming for an essay that is well ordered and clear. Is there a 
sense  of  your  own  voice,  originality  or  a  personal  response?  Your  essay 
should not be vague, but firmly rooted in close textual examination. Always 
include  concise  quotations  as  evidence.  Show  your  specialist  linguistic  and 
literary terms. Don‘t be repetititive. 
 
2. Define the genre of an analyzed text. Are there recognizable genre 
conventions,  or  does  the  writer  break  such  conventions?  What  effect  is 
produced by these means? This might be a significant point to make early in 
your analysis. 
 
3.  What  is  the  text  about?  Analyze  the  content,  the  topic,  the 
material.  
 
4.  Find  out  the  author‘s  intention,  the  purpose  of  the  text:  to 
entertain,  persuade,  instruct,  advise,  inform.  This  might  affect  the  language. 
For  example,  if  it  seeks  to  persuade  the  text  may  use  emotive,  connotative 
language,  and  make  value  judgements.  If  it  is  informative,  concrete  nouns 
and factual adjectives might dominate the text. If it is instructive, imperative 
verbs  are  very  likely.  A  story  may  have  intensifiers  and  the  nouns  may  be 
heavily  modified.  An  argumentative  text  may  have  tentative  modals. 
Remember that a text may have more than one intention.  

 
32 
 
5. In connection with the previous point, regard the  authorial voice. 
How conscious are you of the author? What is the perspective  - first, second 
or  third  person?  Is  the  tone  conversational  or  confessional?  Does  the  writer 
create  a  persona?  Is  s/he  subjective  or  objective?  What  does  the  author 
foreground? 
 
6.  What  is  the  audience  the  text  is  aimed  at?  Age,  sex,  level  of 
education,  specialist  market?  How  does  the  intended  audience  affect  the 
language and how much knowledge is assumed? What other values/attitudes 
of the reader are assumed? What is the language register used and  why  this 
one? 
 
7.  Form  and  structure.  Analyze  the  headlines,  fonts,  italics,  bold, 
punctuation  and  deviations  from  the  orthodox.  But  don‘t  spend  too  long  on 
this,  more  attention  should  be  paid  to  the  inner  structure  and  logical 
architecture  of  the  text.  How  is  the  content  organized?  Is  it  chronological? 
Does it have flashbacks? Is there a logical development of argument  (if, so, 
therefore,  thus,  because)?  Is  there  a  juxtaposition  of  ideas?  How  is  the  text 
introduced and concluded? 
 
8. Style, stylistic devices and inner form. Formal, colloquial, use of 
dialect,  standard,  non-standard.  What  characterizes  the  lexis  (Latinate, 
verbose,  taciturn,  field  specific,  laconic)?  What  about  the  syntax,  are  the 
sentences  simple  or  complex,  or  is  there  an  unusual  word  order?  Is  there 
dialogue, monologue or reported speech? Are nouns pre/post modified? Is the 
tone ironic, humorous, sad angry, patronizing? Is the tone consistent or does 
it shift? Does the text make use of shocking, taboo language? Are there any 
rhetorical  devices?  Active  or  passive  voice?  Metaphors  and  other  literary 
techniques?  More  stylistic  devices  (alliteration,  assonance,  imagery,  simile, 
rhyme,  pararhyme,  personification)  and  the  purpose  of  their  use?  Does  the 
textual  structure  include  textual  cohesion,  reiteration,  ellipsis,  substitution, 
collocation or deviant collocation? 
 
9.  Techniques  of  argumentation  in  the  text:  Persuasion,  political 
tract,  sermon,  advertisement.  Is  there  evidence  of  bias,  or  does  the  writer 
make  concessions  to  the  other  side  of  the  argument?  Does  the  writer 
anticipate  the  other  side  of  the  argument?  Is  there  a  plea  to  or  sense  of 
camaraderie  with  the  audience?  Are  there  balanced  two  part  sentences  and 
use of semi-colons? Is there a more sophisticated lexis? 
 
10.  Your  own  opinion  on  the  subject  and  the  text,  other  additional 
comments.  
 
Exercise  2:  Task  on  foregrounding  –  make  up  three  small  texts  of  10  lines 
using one type of foregrounding in each.  
 

 
33 
Exercise 3: Essay and foregrounding practice:  
 
There are three types of foregrounding:  coupling, convergence and effect of 
defeated expectancy. 
Convergence supposes a number of various devices gathered in a piece of 
text (phrase, sentence, extract etc.) to produce a special effect.  
Example:   Doomsday is near; die all, die merrily. (Shakespeare)  
This brief remark of only 7 words contains: 

Alliteration, 

Rhythm, 

Oxymoron, 

Repetition.  
All these devices are collected to produce the strong emotional effect, express 
vividly the state of mind of the speaking person, his rage and urge for 
revenge.   
Coupling means similar elements in similar positions used to connect ideas 
or a special effect throughout the text (phrase, sentence, passage etc).   
Example: Obama’s speech “Yes. We. Can”(available in the yellow book)  
The slogan is repeated throughout the entire speech connecting passages, 
ideas and intensifying (=foregrounding) the main message. It is an example 
of coupling on the level of macro-context.  All parallel constructions (esp. 
anaphora) could be classic examples of coupling.  
Effect of defeated expectancy 
Example:  
1)  Talk all you like about automatic ovens and electric dishwashers, 
there is nothing you can have around the house as useful as a 
husband
 (Ph. McGinley Sixpence in Her Shoe).  
In this case husband is introduced in the same range as ovens and dishwashes 
which is unexpected and produces humorous effect.  
2)  If I were a dead leaf … 
If I were a swift cloud …  
… (9 lines starting with “if”) 
Oh, lift me as a wave, a leaf, a cloud! 
I fall upon the thorns of life! I bleed!
 (Ode, by Shelley)  
Here we observe the violation of rhythm in the last line (although in previous 
lines of the poem the author keeps going with well-established classical 
iambic rhythm).  This is also a syntactic form of defeated expectancy, as after 
pursuing 9 lines starting with ―if‖, we suddenly break the established rhythm 
and observe a totally different beginning – ―Oh‖, as well as the exclamation 
phrases which hadn‘t occurred before.    
 








 
34 
All these types of foregrounding can work on different levels:  

on the level of micro-context (phrase or sentence) 

on the level of macro- and mega-contexts (plot)  
The task is to make up an essay using all three types of foregrounding on 
different levels. 
A good example could serve an evaluative article, humorous story or an 
essay containing a detective story. First, you can use convergence and 
coupling to produce the atmosphere of intensive stress and strain and 
afterwards introduce the special ending which a reader can‘t predict. But 
actually there is a great variety of other texts which your imagination may 
give birth to.    
30 lines minimum  
 
Seminar 6: “Newspaper style” 
 
1.  Group  presentation:  ―Specifics  of  newspaper  style‖,  ―Creolized 
text. Types, classifications.‖ 
2.  Stylistics theory:  
 
Linguistic features of newspaper style. 
 
Main substyles (genres). 
 
Abbreviations, acronyms and backronyms.  
 
Creolized  texts,  main  features,  structure,  classifications  of 
creolized texts. 
 
3.  Practical  exercises:  Epithet  task  (group  work),  abbreviation  and 
acronym practice.  
4.  Homework:  
 
Make  up  a  newspaper  text  (classified,  brief  news  item  or  other) 
using  as  much  shortenings  of  all  types  as  possible.  Try  to  achieve 
satirical or even absurd effect. 
 
Make  up  an  Editorial  or  Column  article,  expressing  a  personal 
opinion.  The  article  shall  show  your  strong  position  on  the  chosen 
point and arguments pro and con. Reveal your personality in the text 
using  as  many  stylistic  devices  as  possible  and  all  types  of 
foregrounding.   
 
Find especially interesting abbreviations for a class report.  
 
Exercise 1: Epithet work 
 
Students are divided into groups of 3 or 4. Each group has to choose 
an  object  to  be  characterized  (a  car,  resort,  restaurant,  movie,  museum, 









 
35 
laptop, perfume,  drink or any other) and make up at least 3 epithets of each 
type for the object elected.  
Types of epithets:  
Classification of conventional epithets by I.Arnold:  
Постоянный  эпитет  (conventional  or  standing  epithet):  green  wood,  fair 
lady. A constant epithet can be:  
 
tautological (soft pillow),  
 
estimating (bonny boy, bonnie ship),  
 
or descriptive (silk napkin, silver cups).  
Semantically based classification by A. Veselovsky: 
 
Тавтологический  эпитет  (tautological  epithet):  sable  night,  wide 
sea  
 
Пояснительный эпитет (explanatory epithet): grand style, unvalued 
jewels 
 
Метафорический  эпитет  (metaphorical  epithet):  angry  sky, 
howling storm  
 
Голофразис  (holophrasis):  I-am-not-that-kind-of-girl  look,  shoot-
them-down attitude  
 
Инвертированный  эпитет  (inverted  epithet):  an  angel  of  a  girl,  a 
miracle of a car, a jewel of a house. 
After discussing the ready lists of epithets, each group is to produce 
an  advertising  text  for  the  product  under  consideration.  Analyze  the  role  of 
epithets for expressiveness of a text.    
 
Exercise 2: Shortenings, abbreviations, initialisms and acronyms. Exercise 3 
pp. 30 – 31 (pink book).  
 
Exercise 3: Backronymize the word FINEC. Make at least 5 variants. 
 
Exercise  4:  
Some  urban  legends  give  birth  to  quite  credible  stories 
explaining  etymology  of  this  or  that  especially  popular  word.  Such  is  the 
situation with the most used slang swear words as ―shit‖ and ―fuck‖.  
 
The Origin of the F-Word 
Netlore  Archive:  In  which  we  are  asked  to  believe  that  the  word 
'fuck' originated as the acronym of 'Fornication Under Consent of the King,' 
'Fornication  Under  Command  of  the  King,'  'For  Unlawful  Carnal 
Knowledge,' or some other variation thereof. 

 
36 
Description: Folk etymology 
Circulating since: The 1960s 
Status: False  
Example #1: 
Email contributed by T. McInnis, March 22, 2001: 
In ancient England a person could not have sex unless you had 
consent of the King (unless you were in the Royal Family). 
When anyone wanted to have a baby, they got consent of the 
King, the King gave them a placard that they hung on their door 
while they were having sex. The placard had F.*.*.*. 
(Fornication Under Consent of the King) on it. Now you know 
where that came from. 
Example #2: 
From a Usenet posting, Nov. 1, 1990: 
The word fuck comes from colonial times, when someone would 
be punished for 'prostitution' It was an acronym for the words 
'For Unlawful Carnal Knowledge' 
FUCK was written on the stocks that held these criminals 
because For Unlawful Carnal Knowledge was too long to go on 
the stocks. 
Example #3: 
From a Usenet posting, Oct. 12, 1990: 
I always heard that "F.U.C.K." originated in the 1800's in 
London, when they used to charge prostitutes "For Unlawful 
Carnal Knowledge". So officer got sick and tired of writing 
those, um, lessee, 26 characters, not including spaces, so it got 
abbreviated FUCK and stuck. 
Analysis:  Having  consulted  the  definitive  reference  work  on  this  subject 
(yes,  there  is  such  a  thing:  The  F-Word  by  Jesse  Sheidlower,  published  by 
Random House in 1999), I feel confident in dismissing all  the claims above 
as imaginative bunk. 
The  word  fuck  did  not  originate  as  an  acronym.  It  crept,  fully 
formed,  into  the  English  language  from  Dutch  or  Low  German  around  the 

 
37 
15th  century  (it's  impossible  to  say  precisely  when  because  so  little 
documentary  evidence  exists,  probably  due  to  the  fact  that  the  word  was  so 
taboo throughout its early history that people were afraid to write it down). 
The  American  Heritage  Dictionary  says  its  first  known  occurrence 
in English literature was in the satirical poem "Flen, Flyss" (c.1500), where it 
was not only disguised as a Latin  word but encrypted  — gxddbov — which 
has been deciphered as fuccant, pseudo-Latin for "they fuck." 
According  to  Sheidlower,  the  earliest  claims  in  print  of  supposed 
acronymic  origins  for  the  F-word  appeared  during  the  1960s.  An 
underground newspaper called the  East Village Other published this version 
in 1967: 
It's  not  commonly  known  that  the  word  "fuck"  originated  as  a 
medical  diagnostic  notation  on  the  documests  of  soldiers  in  the  British 
Imperial Army. When a soldier reported sick and was found to have V.D., the 
abbreviation  F.U.C.K.  was  stamped  on  his  documents.  It  was  short  for 
"Found Under Carnal Knowledge."
 
Two  more  variants  appeared  in  a  letter  published  in  Playboy 
magazine in 1970: 
My friend claims that the word fuck originated in the 15th Century, 
when a married couple needed permission from the king to procreate. Hence, 
Fornication Under Consent of the King. I maintain that it's an acronym of a 
law term used in the 1500s that referred to rape as Forced Unnatural Carnal 
Knowledge."
 
Undoubtedly the most famous use of this etymological travesty was 
as the title of the 1991 Van Halen album, "For Unlawful Carnal Knowledge." 
 
The Origin of the S-Word 
 
Netlore Archive: In which we are told, and with a straight face, that 
the word 'shit' originated as the acronym of 'Ship High in Transit,' a supposed 
nautical phrase. 
Description: Joke / Folk etymology 
Circulating since: 1999? 
Status: False 
 
Example #1: 
Email contributed by V. Anderson, Aug. 28, 2002: 
Subject: Fabulous bit of historical knowledge 
Ever wonder where the word "shit" comes from. Well here it is: 

 
38 
Certain types of manure used to be transported (as everything 
was back then) by ship. In dry form it weighs a lot less, but once 
water (at sea) hit it. It not only became heavier, but the process of 
fermentation began again, of which a by-product is methane gas. 
As the stuff was stored below decks in bundles you can see what 
could (and did) happen; methane began to build up below decks 
and the first time someone came below at night with a lantern. 
BOOOOM! 
Several ships were destroyed in this manner before it was 
discovered what was happening. 
After that, the bundles of manure where always stamped with the 
term "S.H.I.T" on them which meant to the sailors to "Ship High 
In Transit." In other words, high enough off the lower decks so 
that any water that came into the hold would not touch this 
volatile cargo and start the production of methane. 
Bet you didn't know that one. 
Here I always thought it was a golf term. 
 
Example #2
 
From a Usenet posting dated April 12, 1999: 
Subject: origin of shit 
In the 1800's, cow pie's were collected on the prarie and boxed 
and loaded on steam ships to burn instead of wood. Wood was 
not only hard to find, but heavy to move around and store. 
When the boxes of cow pie's were in the sun for days on board 
the ships, they would smell bad. So when the manure was boxed 
up, they stamped the outside of the box, S.H.I.T....which means 
Ship High In Transit. 
When people came aboard the ship and said,"Oh what is that 
smell!" They were told it was shit. 
That is where the saying came from...It smells like shit! :-) 
 
Analysis:  Clever as all that  may be,  whoever came  up  with it doesn't know 
shit about "shit." According to my dictionary, the word is much older than the 
1800s, appearing in its earliest form about 1,000 years ago as the Old English 
verb scitan. That is confirmed by lexicographer Hugh Rawson in his bawdily 
edifying book, Wicked Words (New York: Crown, 1989), where it is further 



 
39 
noted  that  the  expletive  is  distantly  related  to  words  like  science,  schedule 
and  shield,  all  of  which  derive  from  the  Indo-European  root  skei-,  meaning 
"to cut" or "to split." You get the idea. 
For most of its history "shit" was spelled "shite" (and sometimes still 
is),  but  the  modern,  four-letter  spelling  of  the  word  can  be  found  in  texts 
dating as far back as the mid-1700s. It most certainly did not originate as an 
acronym used by 19th-century sailors. 
Apropos  that  false  premise,  Rawson  observes  that  "shit"  has  long 
been  the  subject  of  naughty  wordplay,  very  often  based  on  made-up 
acronyms on the order of "Ship High in Transit." For example: 
In the Army, officers who did not go to West Point have been known 
to  disparage  the  military  academy  as  the  South  Hudson  Institute  of 
Technology....  And  if  an  angelic  six-year-old  asks,  "Would  you  like  to  have 
some Sugar Honey Iced Tea?", the safest course is to pretend that you have 
suddenly gone stone deaf.
 
Exercise 5: Group work:  
Students are divided into groups of 3 or 4. Each group is to write a brief news 
item of any type (for template see Ex. 5, p. 35, pink book).  Each group shall 
choose  a  topic  for  their  item  –  sport,  arts,  education,  economy,  glamour, 
fashion,  health  etc.  After  the  items  are  ready,  all  groups  are  united  to 
compose a full-fledged newspaper of their texts. By the way, don‘t forget to 
invent  a  title  for  your  collective  newspaper,  make  it  original  using    a 
metaphor, pun or other stylistic device.  
 
 
Seminar 7: “Official documents style” 
 
1.  Group  presentation:  ―Specifics  of  official  documentary:  special 
features of business, military, diplomatic and law substyles.‖   
2.  Stylistics theory:  
 
Linguistic features and stylistic specialties of official style, text 
types. 
 
Business substyle (business letters, business plans, memos, CVs 
etc.) 




 
40 
 
Military substyle and its texttypes. 
 
Diplomatic substyle (Agreements, Notes etc.) 
 
Law substyle (contracts and specifics of legal language). 
 
3.  Practical exercises: 
CV practice, contract work group 
4.  Homework:  
Make  up  your  own  business  plan  of  a  supposed 
business you‘d like to have in future.  
 
Exercise 1: 
A CV: JUST FOR FUN – HOW NOT TO:  
Here's a great CV-resume example published in The Financial Post, Toronto,  
February 23rd, 2001.  
 
Employment Wanted: Former Marijuana Smuggler 
Having successfully completed a ten year sentence, incident-free, for 
importing  75  tons  of  marijuana  into  the  United  States.  I  am  now  seeking  a 
legal and legitimate means to support myself and my family. 
Business  Experience:  Owned  and  operated  a  successful  fishing 
business  -  multi vessel, one airplane, one island and one processing facility. 
Simultaneously  owned  and  operated  a  fleet  of  tractor-trailer  trucks 
conducting business in the western United States. During this time I also co-
owned  and  participated  in  the  executive  level  management  of  120  people 
worldwide in a successful pot smuggling venture with revenues in excess of 
US$100 million annually. 
I took responsibility for my actions, and received a ten year sentence 
in the untied states while others walked free for their cooperation. 
Attributes: I am an expert in all levels of security; I have extensive 
computer  skills,  am  personable,  outgoing,  well-educated,  reliable,  clean  and 
sober.  
I have spoken in schools to thousands of kids and parent groups over 
the  past  ten  years  on  "the  consequences  of  choice",  and  received  public 
recognition from the RCMP for community service.  
I am well-travelled and speak English, French and Spanish. 
References  available  from  friends,  family  and  the  U.S.  District 
Attorney, etc.  
 
Exercise 2: Study the template business plan, make up one of your own and 
present  it  in  the  shape  of  a  business  presentation.  Such  business 
presentation  should  be  more  persuasive  than  just  a  printed  report  due  to 
illustrative  material,  visual  symbols,  already  visible  logos,  more  structured 
and highlighted information.  
 










 
41 
Business Plan 
 
Business  plan  is  an  embracive  multi-page  document  representing  a 
detailed  description  and  thorough  calculation  of  profits  and  expenses  of  a 
future project.  
STRUCTURE:  
A comprehensive business plan should have: 
 
Brief introductory description 
 
Targeted customers and markets section 
 
Present time market research section 
 
Novelty section, showing the new ideas in the project and the market 
niche of the business-to-be 
 
Careful forecast on all expenses  
 
Profit 
expectation 
section 
and 
SWOT-analysis 
(strengths, 
weaknesses, opportunities, threats). 
 
See  a  template  Business  Plan  for  Take  Five  Sports  Bar  and  Grill  in  the 
Appendix 1. 
 
Exercise 3:
 Group work – Contract:  
Students  are  divided  into  groups  of  3  or  4.  Each  group  is  to  compose  a 
contract  on  a  selected  topic.  Introduce  markers  of  interdiscoursivity  and  put 
together  a  contract  between  Cinderella  and  Fairy  Godmother,  Jack  the 
Sparrow  and  pirates  etc.  Try  to  make  especially  visible  contrast  between 
fairytale or movie discourse and straightforward legal language. 
 
Contract embraces the following points:  
 
Heading  stipulating  the  type  of  the  document  (rental  contract, 
commercial services agreement, hotel pre-opening contract etc.), the 
date of signing and the number.   
 
Initial  standardized  phrase  introducing  the  Parties  and  their 
representatives 
 
A  traditional  set  of  paragraphs,  number  of  paragraphs  may  vary 
depending on the type of the contract (mind that in the section titles 
all meaningful words start with capital letters):  
a)  Subject of the Contract 
b)  Terms and Definitions of the Contract (if necessary) 
c)  Rights and Obligations of the Parties 
d)  Price and Settlement Procedure 
e)  Dispute Settlement 
f)  Force Majeure (or Acts of God) 

 
42 
g)  Appendix (if such).   
 
Pay attention to peculiarities of legal English: 

Utilization of specialized words, terms and phrases like: party (a 
principal  of  the  contract),  action  (lawsuit),  execute  (to  sign  to 
effect) etc.  

Archaic lexis valid mostly for legal texts: herein, hereto, hereby, 
heretofore, herewith, whereby, wherefore.  

Use of doublets: null and void, fit and proper etc. 

Unusual  word  order,  for  example:  will  at  the  cost  of  the 
borrower forthwith comply with the same.  

Frequent use of the verb ―shall‖ in its modal meaning.  
 
See the example of a classic contract in Appendix 2.  
 
 
Seminar 8: “Scientific style” 
 
1.  Group  presentation:  ―Specifics  of  scientific  style‖,  ―Stylistic 
stratification  of  lexis.  Classifications.  What‘s  a  neutral  layer? 
Literary  and  colloquial  strata  (bookish  words,  historisms,  slang 
etc)‖. 
2.  Stylistics theory:  

Scientific style, scientific lexis, types of scientific texts. 

Terms, their specifics and main functions. 

Stylistic classification of lexis. 

Superneutral  style  lexis  (poetic  words,  foreignisms, 
barbarisms etc.) 

Subneutral style lexis (slang, jargon, cant, professionalisms, 
vulgarisms etc.)  
3.  Practical exercises: transformation exercises, read and analyze a 
scientific prose text, discuss specifics of Intertextuality in scientific 
texts.   
4.  Homework: Transform the scientific fiction text from Exercise 2 
into belle-letters style by avoiding terms, usage of descriptive and 
emotional epithets, filling the text with tropes.  
 
Exercise  1:  
The  groups  having  participated  in  Seminar  6  get  reunited  to 
make  up  a  list  of  relevant  terms  or  highly  literary  words  to  describe  the 
products  advertised  before.  Introducing  such  kind  of  lexis,  introductory 
phrases  and  prepositions  and  special  conjuncts  along  with  elimination  of 

 
43 
vivid  epithets  students  have  to  transform  advertising  texts  into  scientific-
looking texts.  
Discuss the results.  
 
Exercise  2:  Read  and  analyze  the  text  from  popular  scientific  magazine 
―National Geographic‖, describe the science fiction style: 
 
What If the Biggest Solar Storm on Record Happened Today? 
Repeat  of  1859  Carrington  Event  would  devastate  modern  world, 
experts say 
Richard A. Lovett for National Geographic News 
Published March 2, 2011 
On February 14 the sun erupted with the largest solar flare seen 
in four years — big enough to interfere with radio communications and 
GPS signals for airplanes on long-distance flights.
 
As  solar  storms  go,  the  Valentine's  Day  flare  was  actually  modest. 
But the burst of activity is only the start of the upcoming solar maximum, due 
to peak in the next couple of years. 
"The  sun  has  an  activity  cycle,  much  like  hurricane  season,"  Tom 
Bogdan,  director  of  the  Space  Weather  Prediction  Center  in  Boulder, 
Colorado,  said  earlier  this  month  at  a  meeting  of  the  American  Association 
for the Advancement of Science in Washington, D.C. 
"It's  been  hibernating  for  four  or  five  years,  not  doing  much  of 
anything."  Now  the  sun  is  waking  up,  and  even  though  the  upcoming  solar 
maximum  may  see  a  record  low  in  the  overall  amount  of  activity,  the 
individual events could be very powerful. 
In fact, the biggest solar storm on record happened in 1859, during a 
solar  maximum  about  the  same  size  as  the  one  we're  entering,  according  to 
NASA. 
That  storm  has  been  dubbed  the  Carrington  Event,  after  British 
astronomer  Richard  Carrington,  who  witnessed  the  megaflare  and  was  the 
first  to  realize  the  link  between  activity  on  the  sun  and  geomagnetic 
disturbances on Earth. 
During  the  Carrington  Event,  northern  lights  were  reported  as  far 
south as Cuba and Honolulu, while southern lights were seen as far north as 
Santiago, Chile.  
The  flares  were  so  powerful  that  "people  in  the  northeastern  U.S. 
could read newspaper print just  from the light of the aurora," Daniel Baker, 
of  the  University  of  Colorado's  Laboratory  for  Atmospheric  and  Space 
Physics, said at a geophysics meeting last December. 

 
44 
In  addition,  the  geomagnetic  disturbances  were  strong  enough  that 
U.S. telegraph operators reported sparks leaping from their equipment—some 
bad enough to set fires, said Ed Cliver, a space physicist at the U.S. Air Force 
Research Laboratory in Bedford, Massachusetts. 
In  1859,  such  reports  were  mostly  curiosities.  But  if  something 
similar happened today, the world's high-tech infrastructure could grind to a 
halt. 
"What's  at  stake,"  the  Space  Weather  Prediction  Center's  Bogdan 
said,  "are  the  advanced  technologies  that  underlie  virtually  every  aspect  of 
our lives." 
 
 
Seminar 9: “Persuasiveness”  
 
1.  Group  presentation:  ―Persuasiveness.  Types  of  linguistic 
influencing the audience.  Strategy and tactics. Examples.‖ 
2.  Stylistics theory:  

Persuasiveness and general views on the notion. 

Argumentation, manipulation, suggestiveness, NLP. 

Pragmatic persuasive strategies and tactics.  

Main functions.  
3.  Practical  exercises:  Analysis  of  the  best  examples  of  American 
oratory  (yellow  book)  from  the  point  of  view  of  their  persuasive 
potential.    
4.  Homework:  Compose  a  speech  on  a  chosen  topic  (topics  are 
indicated in the Ex. 2)  following the scheme of persuasive  strategy 
and  tactics.  Try  to  implement  all  possible  tactics  and  devices  to 
make it bright and emotional. Use tips from Ex.1.  
 
Persuasive strategy and tactics: 
 
Persuasiveness  is  a  complex  of  argumentative  and  manipulative 
methods  and  devices  applied  with  the  purpose  of  influencing  the  recipient. 
The  global  persuasive  strategy  is  implicated  with  the  help  of  more  precise 
tactics  and  devices.  Thus,  a  tactic  is  defined  as  a  conceptual  action,  an 
assembly of devices and forms aimed at achievement of a certain stage of the 
strategy.   
For  example,  the  political  discourse  is  served  by  numerous  multi-
purpose tactics, some of which are:  
1.  Positive self-representation and formation of the ―friend‖ field.  
2.  Discrimination of the opponent and formation of the ―foe‖ field.  

 
45 
3.  Intimization of the exposition. 
4.  Effect  of  evidence  and  common  knowledge  for  certain  events 
and facts.   
5.  Promise and ready-solution offer. 
 
The  tactic  of  positive  self-representation  and  formation  of  the 
“friend” field is the dominative one inherent to the entire political discourse 
and  all  its  text-types  whereas  it  evokes  the  central  political  ―friend  –  foe‖ 
dichotomySome of the devices foregrounding the tactic are:  
-  Pronouns ―we / our‖ used in the inclusive function, uniting the 
speaker  and  the  audience,  consolidating  the  addressor  and  the 
addressee (e.g. phrases like ―we, Americans‖ or ―our American 
ideals‖ etc.) 
-  Abstract nouns denoting the national values and epithets of the 
―friend‖ lexical field.  The nominations of the speaker are used 
in the context of positive connotation.  
-  Stylistic  devices  (metaphors,  similes,  epithets  etc)  express  the 
emotiveness and the evaluative character of the text. 
-  Reference  to  the  authority  is  another  important  device  within 
the frameworks of the tactic. This device is actualized by means 
of quotations and epigraphs. An opinion of a respectable person 
can  illustrate  the  speaker‘s  point  of  view  and  give  additional 
proofs to the speaker‘s arguments.   
The  tactic  of  discrimination  of  the  opponent  and  formation  of 
the “foe” field is closely interwoven  with the tactic  mentioned above, only 
with an opposite sign. The speaker uses the nominations of his/her opponents 
and  foes  in  the  negative  context,  excluding  them  of  the  positive  field 
―speaker – audience‖.  
The  example  from  the  1996  Republican  Party  program  illustrates 
these two tactics:  
Throughout this century, Republican presidents have worked hard to 
preserve  our  national  military  preparedness.  By  contrast,  during  the  Carter 
administration, America‘s power and prestige around the world fell to an all-
time low. 
By means of the tactic of intimization the speaker seeks to address 
directly the  wide audience,  mass recipient and  make a close contact  with it. 
To attract the addressee‘s attention the tactic employs:    
-  Invitation of the recipient to the ―pseudo-dialog‖, creation of the 
illusion  of  his  active  participation  in  the  discussion  using  the 

 
46 
address (Dear friends, dear citizens, Americans, citizens of New 
York etc) 
-  Rhetorical questions 
-  Hypophora  
-  Units  of  subjective  modality  (yes,  of  course,  unfortunately, 
fortunately,  desperately),  creating  an  effect  of  live  colloquial 
speech and optimizing the perception.  
-  Exclamatory sentences, e.g.:  
Throughout  most  of  this  century,  the  United  States  has  willingly 
provided leadership for the free world! 
The  tactic  creating  the  effect  of  evidence  and  common 
knowledge for certain events and facts is based on the usage of facts with 
no  back-ground  and  no  arguments,  the  facts  are  presented  just  as  they  are. 
The tactic involves: 
-  Passive constructions 
-  Adverbs (always, surely, of course) 
-  Assertives  
-  Frequent nominations of the  recipient to connect him with the 
facts described 
-  Impersonal  pronouns  (everybody,  everyone)  and  personal 
pronouns in the inclusive function (we, our). E.g.:  
 
Our housing policy is a failure on a number of levels. Public housing 
is  the  most  obvious  disaster.  Many  complexes,  as  everyone  knows,  are 
demonstrably hellholes.  
The tactic of promise and ready-solution offer  is actualized  with 
the help of: 
-  Modal verbs (should, shall, would, must) 
-  Modal constructions (it is necessary, it is needed) 
-  Introductory phrases like we believe, we assume   
E.g.:  Limitations  on  privatizing  airports  should  be  removed. 
Limitations  on  toll  roads  should  be  removed,  and  the  user  fees  generated  to 
cover the costs of construction and operation should not be funneled through 
the  federal  government.  These  steps  would  help  channel  infrastructure 
development  to  those  areas  that  transportation  users  have  deemed  the  most 
useful. 
 

 
47 
Exercise 1:  Read the article from www.public-speaking-advice.com and get 
prepared for writing a funny persuasive speech of your own:   
 
Funny Persuasive Speeches - How To Do It 
 
Funny persuasive speeches are ones that aim to get your audience to 
take action. It is often a persuasive emotional speech and covers speech ideas 
like: Abortion, AIDS, Animal Welfare, Body Piercings, Church State Issues, 
Dieting,  Euthenasia,  Fraud,  Gambling,  Gay  Marriage,  Global  Warming, 
Human Cloning, Illegal Drugs & Steriods, Iraq War, Marriage and Divorce, 
Organ  Donation,  Politics,  Recycling,  Religion,  Smoking,  Student  Debt, 
Terrorism, Vaccinations etc.  
It  is  not  always  appropriate  to  be  funny  in  the  speech,  but  used 
carefully it can bring cheer to some heavy topics. 
Here's an example of a quip to put in a funny persuasive speech: 
"You don't realise how lucky you are until you get married - then it's 
too late!" 
"I  offered  to  donate  blood,  but  they  said  they  could  not  afford  to 
filter it to get the alcohol out of it!" 
"Please God – send Superman" (from the Simpsons) 
"Human  cloning  –  imagine    two  of  me  ...  oh  heck,  my  wifes  just 
fainted!" 
The core of  funny persuasive speeches is to give over an argument 
for  or  against  a  particular  topic  and  convince  the  audience  that  they  should 
agree with you.  
The  audience  is  the  key.  You  need  to  make  sure  you  get  them  on 
your side quickly and support the funny speech with facts and examples.  
To  make  your  speech  compelling  to  your  audience,  you  should 
create  an  exciting  title.  Here  are  some  examples  of  persuasive  speech  idea 
titles:  The  case  for  organ  donation,  The  need  for  recycling,  Why  the  death 
penalty should be abolished, The need for gun control, The dangers of taking 
illegal steroids, How to pay off your credit card.   
When making the persuasive speech you should:  
1) Engage with your audience – make eye contact and be open with 
your body language; 
2) Keep to the facts – facts will convince your audience;  
3) Use plenty of examples to illustrate your points; 
4) Be funny where it is appropriate; 
5)  Encourage  debate  –  if  you  can  get  other  audience  members  on 
your side, you can persuade the majority; 

 
48 
6)  Be  passionate  about  the  persuasive  speech  idea  –  if  you  aren't 
then your audience won't be either.  
Be  confident  and  you  can  begin  to  encourage  your  audience  to 
follow your funny persuasive speeches. 
 
Exercise  2:  
Here  are  25  funny  speech  topics.  Use  them  to  tickle  your  own 
imagination.  Vary  on  the  speech  topic  ideas,  public  speaking  themes, 
entertaining  and  humorous  subjects  and  issues.  For  instance  think  about 
practical jokes or opposite statements. Turn things up side down, and you can 
create a lot of ideas for funny speech topics of your own. Try to persuade you 
listeners  to  agree  the  way  you  see  things  in  a  funny  topic  for  a  persuasive 
speech: 
1.  What to do with good advice that actually isn't good? 
2.  How to use politically correct terms for embarrassing moments. 
3.  How to get rid of boring blind dates. 
4.  If you think you can, you can - or not. 
5.  How to laugh every day. 
6.  Bingo keeps grandmoms off the streets. 
7.  What is a funny topic or humorous speech anyway? 
8.  Why vegetarians don't love animals. 
9.  Limiting alternatives will make your choice easier. 
10.  Don't take life too seriously. 
11.  How to eat things you don‘t like to eat. 
12.  How to blame your dog for everything that goes wrong. 
13.  Banks have to ban sunglasses and hats to avoid robberies. 
14.  Ordering the world the funny way. 
15.  Blonds are not stupid. 
16.  Why fair play doesn't work. 
17.  How to annoy the passenger next to you on a flight. 
18.  How to handle unreadable Windows error messages. 
19.  What to do when you're stuck in an elevator. 
20.  Polite ways to ruin a reputation. 
21.  Humorous things to do with superglue. 
22.  How the rich stay rich and the poor poor. 
23.  The benificial effects of smoking. 
24.  How to set up practical jokes. 
25.  The search for The Holy Grail is nothing compared to my search for 
a cheat sheet at the stylistics exam. 
 
 
 


 
49 
Seminar 10: “Belle-letters and poetry style” 
 
1.  Group presentation:  ―Specifics of English versification. Is there a 
poetic  style?‖,  ―Genres  of  belle-letters  style  (emotive  prose, 
detective stories, fantasy and special genres‖. 
2.  Stylistics theory:  

Belle-letters style and its main features (lexis, devices used, 
emotiveness etc). 

Specifics of poetic texts. 

Blank verses, alliterative verses and special poetic genres. 

Main functions of emotive prose texts.  
3.  Practical  exercises:  exercise  on  creation  of  alliterative  slogans, 
stylistic analysis of poetic texts.   
4.  Homework:  Analyze a poem using the  scheme of  stylistic analysis 
adding analysis of poetic structure.  
 
Exercise 1: Group work – limerick and nursery rhyme practice.  
 
Exercise  2:  Used  in  ancient  poetry,  nowadays  in  ad  slogans  -  alliteration  is 
still very popular.  Role of alliteration is shown in the exercise on creation of 
alliterative  slogans.    Make  up  at  least  5  alliterative  phrases  to  advertise  a 
product or products upon your choice.  
 
Exercise 3: Stylistic analysis of fantasy genre text (e.g. Harry Potter). 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
50 
APPENDIX 1:  
 
Sports Bar Business Plan 
Take Five Sports Bar and Grill 
 
Executive Summary 
Take Five Sports Bar and Grill has established a successful presence 
in the food and beverage service industry. The flagship location in suburban 
Anytown (Medlock Bridge) will gross in excess of $2 million in sales in its 
first  year  of  operation.  First  year  operations  will  produce  a  net  profit  of 
$445,000.  This  will  be  generated  from  an  investment  of  $625,000  in  initial 
capital.  Since  10  months  of  operations  have  already  been  completed  the 
confidence  level  for  final  first  year  numbers  is  extremely  high.  The  first  10 
months of start-up costs, sales revenues, and operating expenses are actual.  
Expansion  plans  are  already  underway.  Owner  funding  and 
internally  generated  cash  flow  will  enable  additional  stores  to  open.  Sales 
projections  for  the  next  four  years  are  based  upon  current  planned  store 
openings.  Site  surveys  have  been  completed  and  prime  locations  have  been 
targeted for store expansion.  
The sales figures and projections presented here are based upon an additional 
four  store  locations  at  the  most  premium  sites  available  in  the  Anytown 
Metro market area as well as a prime resort location in Destin, Florida.  
Management  has  recognized  the  rapid  growth  potential  made 
possible  by  the  quick  success  and  fast  return-on-investment  from  the  first 
location.  Payback  of  total  invested  capital  on  the  first  location  will  be 
realized  in  less  than  18  months  of  operation.  Cash  flow  becomes  positive 
from operations immediately and profits are substantial in the first year. 
1.1 Objectives 
Take Five has the objective of opening additional stores in Anytown 
Metro  at  Ashford-Dunwoody,  Lawrenceville,  Buckhead,  and  East  Cobb. 












 
51 
Additionally, a store  will be opened on the beach at Destin, Florida, a year-
round resort destination.  
The  management  of  Take  Five  has  demonstrated  its  concept, 
execution,  marketability,  and  controls,  and  feels  confident  of  its  ability  to 
successfully  replicate  the  quick  ramp-up  of  the  Medlock  Bridge  location  to 
additional venues.  
The following objectives have been established:  
 
Have all five stores operational by Year 3 with a sequential time-line 
of openings.  
 
Maintain  tight  control  of  costs  and  operations  by  hiring  quality 
management  at  each  location  and  utilizing  automated  computer 
control.  
 
Keep food cost under 32% of revenue.  
 
Keep beverage cost under 21% of revenue.  
 
Select only locations that meet all the parameters of success.  
 
Grow each location to the $3 to $5 million annual sales level.  
1.2 Mission 
Take Five Sports Bar and Grill strives to be the premier sports theme 
restaurant  in  the  Southeast  Region.  Our  goal  is  to  be  a  step  ahead  of  the 
competition.  We  want  our  customers  to  have  more  fun  during  their  leisure 
time. We provide more televisions with more sporting events than anywhere 
else in the region. We provide state-of-the-art table-top audio control at each 
table so the customer can listen to the selected program of his or her choice 
without  interference  from  background  noise.  We  combine  menu  selection, 
atmosphere,  ambiance,  and  service  to  create  a  sense  of  "place"  in  order  to 
reach our goal of over-all value in a dining/entertainment experience.  
1.3 Keys to Success 
The keys to success in achieving our goals are:  
 
Product quality. Not only great food but great service.  
 
Managing  finances  to  enable  new  locations  to  open  at  targeted 
intervals.  
 
Controlling costs at all times without exception.  
 
Instituting management controls to insure replicability of operations 
over multiple locations. This applies equally to product control and 
to financial control.  
Company Summary 
The  key  elements  of  Take  Five's  restaurant  store  concept  are  as 
follows:  
 
Sports  based  themes  –  The  company  will  focus  on  themes  that 
have mass appeal.  







 
52 
 
Distinctive  design  features  –  All  stores  will  be  characterized  by 
spectacular  visual  design  and  layout.  Each  store  will  display  a 
collection of authentic sports memorabilia.  
 
High  profile  locations  –  The  company  selects  its  store  locations 
based  on  key  demographic  indicators,  including  traffic  counts, 
average income, number of households, hotels, and offices within a 
certain radius.  
 
Celebrity events – The company stores will be distinguished by the 
promotional activities of sports celebrities and by media coverage of 
appearances and special events.  
 
Retail merchandising – Each store will include an integrated retail 
store  offering  premium  quality  merchandise  displaying  the 
company's logo design. In addition sports memorabilia will be sold.  
 
Quality  food  –  Each  Take  Five  store  will  serve  freshly  prepared, 
high quality, popular cuisine that is targeted to appeal to a variety of 
tastes  and  budgets  with  an  emphasis  on  reasonably  and  moderately 
priced signature items of particular appeal to a local market.  
 
Quality  service  –  In  order  to  maintain  its  unique  image  the 
Company provides attentive and friendly service with a high ratio of 
service  personnel  to  customers  and  also  invests  in  the  training  and 
supervision of its employees.  
2.1 Company History 
Take  Five  Sports  Bar  and  Grill  was  founded  in  1995  by  Joseph 
Smith  to  capitalize  on  the  ever  growing  market  demand  for  high  end 
technology  enhanced  sports  theme  restaurants.  Take  Five  has  promoted  its 
brand through the operation of its existing location at Medlock Bridge Road 
and State Bridge Road in Anytown, Georgia. The flagship location provides a 
unique  dining  and  entertainment  experience  in  a  high-energy  environment. 
Customer  acceptance  has  been  proven.  Regular  and  repeat  customers  cross 
many age demographics and families are frequent diners.  
Take  Five  has  promoted  heavily  with  tie-ins  to  Anytown 
professional teams and celebrities. Take Five Sports Bar and Grill is the radio 
home  for  the  live  Monday  Night  XYZ  Anytown  Falcons  coaches  show 
featuring June Jones and Jeff George. This show is broadcast during the hour 
preceding  the  telecast  of  "Monday  Night  Football".  In  addition,  Take  Five 
hosts the Anytown Hawks sports talk show on ABC 750 AM featuring guard 
Steve Smith and the radio voice of the Hawks, Steve Holman. The Anytown 
Braves  celebrated  their  World  Series  championship  party  at  Take  Five  the 
night they won the Series.  
 

 
53 
Past Performance 
 
FY 1993 
FY 1994 
FY 1995 
Sales 
$0  
$0  
$634,900  
Gross Margin 
$0  
$0  
$394,000  
 
 
 
 
Operating Expenses 
$0  
$0  
$301,000  
Inventory Turnover 
0.00  
0.00  
20.00  
Balance Sheet 
 
 
 
Current Assets 
 
 
 
Cash 
$0  
$0  
$67,136  
Inventory 
$0  
$0  
$15,197  
Other Current Assets 
$0  
$0  
$17,310  
Total Current Assets 
$0  
$0  
$99,643  
 
 
 
 
Long-term Assets 
$0  
$0  
$475,495  
Accumulated Depreciation 
$0  
$0  
$29,713  
 
 
 
 
Total Assets 
$0  
$0  
$545,425  
Current Liabilities 
 
 
 
Accounts Payable 
$0  
$0  
$20,040  
Current Borrowing 
$0  
$0  
$0  
Other  Current  Liabilities  (interest $0  
$0  
$40,826  
free) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Paid-in Capital 
$0  
$0  
$625,000  
Retained Earnings 
$0  
$0  
($218,401) 
Earnings 
$0  
$0  
$77,960  
Total Capital 
$0  
$0  
$484,559  
Total Capital and Liabilities 
$0  
$0  
$545,425  
Other Inputs 
 
 
 
Payment Days 
0  
0  
0  




 
54 
2.2 Company Ownership 
Take Five Sports Bar and Grill is a privately held Georgia company. 
Joseph  A.  Smith  is  the  principal  owner.  It  is  Mr.  Smith's  intention  to  offer 
limited  outside  ownership  in  Take  Five  on  an  equity,  debt,  or  combination 
basis in order to facilitate a more rapid expansion of the Take Five concept.  
Mr. Smith holds an MBA in Finance from Anytown University. He 
has  held  executive  level  positions  in  finance  with  General  Electric  and 
Holiday  Inn  Worldwide.  He  is  previously  experienced  in  the  restaurant 
industry,  having  opened  Smith's  Italian  Restaurant  in  1993,  which  still 
operates successfully under his ownership. 
2.3 Company Locations and Facilities 
The company units will range in size from 6,000 to 9,000 square feet 
and will seat from 225 to 400 persons. Each Take Five Sports Bar and Grill 
will  feature  authentic  sports  memorabilia  such  as  Michael  Jordan's  game 
jersey to Jimmy Connor's signed tennis racquet. Each store will be equipped 
with state-of-the-art audio and video systems to enable the customer to enjoy 
the  game  of  their  choice.  Every  restaurant  will  be  built  to  existing 
specifications, clean looking, open, and pleasing to the customer.  
Unit locations are as follows:  
 
Medlock  Bridge  –  This  unit  is  located  at  one  of  the  busiest 
intersections in North Fulton County. It is surrounded by four major 
country clubs, upper middle class neighborhoods, office complexes, 
and  shopping.  It  encompasses  6,000  sq.  ft.  of  space  and  has  been 
open since August 1995.  
 
Ashford-Dunwoody  –  This  unit  will  open  in  late  summer  1996. 
Size will be 7,200 sq.ft. The location is one and one-half miles north 
of  Perimeter  Mall.  Within  a  three  mile  radius  there  is  20  million 
square  feet  of  professional  office  space.  Also,  an  abundance  of 
upscale  apartment  complexes  adjoins  the  unit.  Major  chain  hotels 
are  located  nearby.  Perimeter  Mall  is  one  of  the  regional  upscale 
shopping destinations.  
 
Lawrenceville (New Market) – This site will occupy 6,500 square 
feet and is scheduled to open in the Spring of 1997. It will be built 
as a free standing building on a 2+ acre parcel at the intersection of 
Rt. 120 and Rt. 316. Adjacent to the property is an 18 screen movie 
theater  opened  by  AMC  in  March  1996.  This  is  the  largest  theater 
AMC has built in the Anytown area. New Market Mall has as master 
anchors  Target,  Home  Depot,  and  Marshalls  among  others.  The 
demographics  are  very  favorable  with  no  competition  from  other 
sports bar restaurants.  


 
55 
 
Peachtree  and  Piedmont  (Buckhead)  –  This  unit  will  be  in  the 
heart  of  Buckhead  which  is  Anytown's  most  comprehensive 
business  and  entertainment  center.  In  addition  to  retail  space  being 
constructed  at  this  sight  the  unit  will  be  adjacent  to  a  200+  room 
America's  Suite  Hotel.  Buckhead  is  one  of  the  nation's  largest  and 
fastest-growing  mixed  use  urban  areas.  It  includes  a  dynamic 
combination  of  concentrated  offices,  retail,  hotel,  shopping, 
restaurant/entertainment, and residential development.  
 
Market Analysis, Strategy and Implementation Summary 
Our strategy is based on serving our niche markets well. The sports 
enthusiast, the business entertainer and traveler, the local night crowd, as well 
as families dining out all can enjoy the Take Five experience.  
What begins as a customized version of a standard product, tailored 
to  the  needs  of  a  local  clientele,  can  become  a  niche  product  that  will  fill 
similar needs in similar markets across the Southeast.  
We  are  building  our  infrastructure  so  that  we  can  replicate  the 
product,  the  experience,  and  the  environment  across  broader  geographic 
lines. Concentration will be on maintaining quality and establishing a strong 
identity  in  each  local  market.  The  identity  becomes  the  source  of  "critical 
mass"  upon  which  expansion  efforts  are  based.  Not  only  does  it  add 
marketing  muscle  but  it  also  becomes  the  framework  for  further  expansion 
using  both  company  owned  and  franchised  store  locations.  Franchises  will 
first be marketed in late 1997 or early 1998. 
4.1 Marketing Strategy 
A  combination  of  local  media  and  event  marketing  will  be  utilized  at  each 
location. Radio is most effective, followed by local print media. As soon as a 
concentration of stores is established in a market, then broader media will be 
employed.  
The  strategy  of  live  broadcasting  and  pro  sports  tie-ins  has  been  most 
effective in generating free publicity for the flagship location which has been 
more effective than any advertising that could have been purchased. 
4.1.1 Marketing Programs 
Take  Five  will  create  an  "identity"  oriented  marketing  strategy  with 
executions  particularly  in  local  media.  Radio  spots,  print  ads,  and  in-store 
promotions are designed for transplantation to other markets. A portion of the 
ad and promo budget is set aside to develop these programs.  
4.1.2 Pricing Strategy 
All menu items are moderately priced. An average customer ticket is between 
$10  and  $20  including  food  and  drink.  Tickets  are  considerably  larger  for 
game  day  visitors.  Our  average  customer  spends  more  than  the  industry 

 
56 
average for moderately priced establishments. We  tend to believe that this is 
due  to  our  creating  an  atmosphere  that  encourages  longer  stays  and  more 
spending  but  still  allows  adequate  table  turns  due  to  extended  hours  of 
appeal.  
4.1.3 Promotion Strategy 
We  promote  sports,  sports,  and  more  sports.  The  universal  appeal  of  sports 
and  sports  marketing  has  never  been  higher.  A  high  growth  area  such  as 
Anytown has an annual influx of new residents from many other parts of the 
country. This trend is true in the Sunbelt in general.  
Many  new  residents  and  many  existing  ones  are  fans  of  teams  in  other 
markets. Take Five is a place for all. Each patron can watch his or her game 
of interest. The enabling technology is the benchmark for Take Five.  
Advertising  budgets  and  sports  event  promotion  is  an  on-going  process  of 
management  geared  to  promote  the  brand  name  and  keep  Take  Five  at  the 
forefront of sports theme establishments in each local marketing area.  
In  addition,  funds  are  budgeted  to  launch  franchise  sales  activity  and  lead 
generation. These funds amount to 20% of projected franchise sales.  
4.2 Sales Strategy 
The sales strategy is to build and open new locations on schedule in order to 
increase  revenue.  Each  individual  location  will  continue  to  build  its  local 
customer  base  over  the  first  three  years  of  operation.  The  goal  is  $3  to  $5 
million in annual sales per unit. A unit will be considered mature once it has 
passed the $3.5 million mark in annual sales.  
The following sections illustrate the combined sales forecast: 
4.2.1 Sales Forecast 
The  following  chart  and  table  shows  the  rapid  sales  ramp-up  for  our  first 
location in only its  first twelve  months of operation. The  two  million dollar 
sales volume represents somewhat less than 50% of the revenue potential of 
the  location.  All  sales  forecasts  and  projections  have  this  first  year  as  their 
basis for each new store. 
 
Sales Forecast 
 
 
 
 
Sales 
FY 1996 
FY 1997 
FY 1998 
Food 
$1,026,242   $4,411,500   $7,497,000  
Drinks 
$998,276   $4,238,500   $7,203,000  
Retail 
$17,926  
$48,000  
$84,000  
Franchise Fees 
$0  
$500,000   $1,300,000  
Total Sales 
$2,042,444   $9,198,000  $16,084,000  

 
57 
Direct Cost of Sales 
FY 1996 
FY 1997 
FY 1998 
Food 
$349,013   $1,449,910   $2,548,980  
Drinks 
$219,561  
$932,470   $1,584,660  
Retail 
$9,064  
$24,000  
$42,000  
Franchise Fees 
$0  
$125,000  
$260,000  
Subtotal Direct Cost of Sales 
$577,638   $2,531,380   $4,435,640  
4.3 Milestones 
The  following  table  lists  important  milestones,  with  projected  dates, 
management, and budget responsibility. The milestone schedule indicates our 
emphasis on planning for implementation.  
Milestones 
Start 
Milestone 
End Date 
Budget  Manager Department 
Date 
Open Medlock 
8/1/1995 8/30/1995  $625,000  
JS 
Exec 
Bridge 
Open Ashford-
8/1/1996 8/30/1996  $700,000  
JS 
Exec 
Dunwoody 
Open 
12/1/1996  2/1/1997 $1,000,000  
JS 
Exec 
Lawrenceville 
Open Buckhead 
2/28/1997  6/1/1997  $700,000  
JS 
Exec 
Open Destin 
7/1/1997  3/1/1998 $1,500,000  
JS 
Exec 
Open East Cobb 
2/1/1998  6/1/1998  $600,000  
JS 
Exec 
Private Placement 
8/1/1995  9/1/1996 
$82,500  
LC 
Finance 
Totals 
 
 
$5,207,500  
 
 
Management Summary 
At  the  present  time  Joseph  Smith  runs  all  operations  for  Take  Five 
Sports  Bar  and  Grill.  Other  key  personnel  are  the  management  at  each 
location.  Candidates  have  already  been  identified  for  the  first  additional 
Anytown area location. There is not expected to be any shortage of qualified 
and  available  staff  and  management  from  local  labor  pools  in  each  market 
area. 
5.1 Organizational Structure 
Future  organizational  structure  will  include  a  director  of  store  operations 
when  store  locations  exceed  five  and/or  the  Florida  store  opens.  This  will 
provide  a  supervisory  level  between  the  executive  level  and  the  store 
management  level.  A  full  time  accountant  has  already  been  added.  Also,  a 

 
58 
sales/marketing director has been added to oversee the expansion effort both 
to  support  the  growth  of  existing  business  and  to  execute  the  franchise 
expansion strategy. Their salaries are included in the projections.  
Operations  of  individual  stores  will  be  the  responsibility  of  the  general 
manager. 
5.2 Management Team 
Joseph Smith
  
Personal Data:  
Born 
11/19/53 
Philadelphia, 
Pa. 
Married 
17 
years--two 
children 
ages 
10 

13 
Excellent 
Health 
U.S.  Air  Force--1971  to  1975,  Vietnam  veteran,  Communication 
Surveillance, Top Security Clearance  
Education:  
LaSalle University, MBA Finance, BS, Finance  
Professional Experience:  
RCA/GE--1978-1988:  
Finance, Strategic Planning, Corporate Development  
Scientific Anytown--1988-1990:  
VP Finance, Electronic Systems Group  
Holiday Inn Worldwide--1990-1993:  
Strategic Planning and Corporate Development, reporting to the CFO  
Resigned in 1993 to open and operate Smith's Italian Restaurant 
5.3 Management Team Gaps 
Specific  opportunities  exist  in  the  store  operations  supervisory  area  (not 
needed initially) and in franchise sales development (not needed initially).  
It is expected that these people can be recruited when needed in the Anytown 
market.  Anytown  is  now  home  to  more  than  40  franchise  company 
headquarters.  
Store  managers  are  readily  available  when  needed.  Food  service  managers 
are plentiful. 
5.4 Personnel Plan 
The  following  personnel  table  outlines  the  projected  staff  requirements  for 
the first three years of operation.  
Personnel Plan 
 
FY 1996 
FY 1997 
FY 1998 
Total Payroll 
$484,800  $2,800,000  $4,850,000  
Name or Title or Group 
$0  
$0  
$0  
Total People 
12 
67  
115  
Total Payroll 
$484,800  $2,800,000  $4,850,000  




 
59 
Financial Plan 
The  over-all  financial  plan  for  growth  allows  for  use  of  the 
significant cash flow generated by operations.  
Equity/debt  infusion  of  $1.5  to  $2  million  allows  for  more  rapid 
expansion  of  store  starts  than  could  be  accomplished  from  cash  flow  alone. 
Outside  investment  capital  also  allows  a  buffer  of  excess  cash  so  that  the 
expansion  plan  can  be  revised  on  short  notice.  Every  opportunity  will  be 
seized to accelerate expansion past the critical dates in this plan if cash flow 
from new stores exceeds projections.  
It is management's intent to build equity in the brand name and in its 
franchise.  Other  models  exists  in  the  recent  past  of  successful  IPO's  on 
similar concepts. 
6.1 Important Assumptions 
The financial plan depends on important assumptions, most of which 
are shown in the following table. The key underlying assumptions are:  
 
We assume a slow-growth economy, without major recession.  
 
We  assume  access  to  equity  capital  and  financing  sufficient  to 
maintain our financial plan as shown in the tables.  
 
We  assume  the  continued  popularity  of  sports  in  America  and  the 
growing demand for sports theme venues.  
6.2 Key Financial Indicators 
The  most  important  indicator  in  our  case  is  inventory  turnover.  In 
the  restaurant  business  turnover  exceeds  50,  with  product  being  purchased 
and sold often within the week.  
Food costs must be kept below 32%.  
Beverage costs must be kept below 21%.  
Above all, controls must be instituted and maintained over multiple 
store locations.  
Take  Five  now  uses  state-of-the-art  restaurant  management  control 
and  inventory  systems.  All  systems  are  computer  based  that  allow  for 
accurate  off-premises  control  of  all  aspects  of  food  and  beverage  service 
business.  The  systems  used  are  point-of-sale  from  HSI  and  inventory  and 
recipe management from VIP. Both systems are PC based and have become 
industry standards.  
Management's 
background 
in 
corporate 
finance 
indicates 
understanding of the importance of these control systems. 
6.3 Break-even Analysis 
The  break  even  analysis  is  based  upon  fixed  costs  at  the  Medlock 
Bridge  location.  This  location  exceeded  required  volume  to  break  even  in 
only its second month of operation.  
At $15 per average ticket the break even volume at Medlock Bridge 
is attained less than one full seating per day. The industry average is between 
3 and 4 turns of seating capacity. 

 
60 
Break-even Analysis 
Monthly Revenue Break-even 
$86,205  
Assumptions: 
 
Average Percent Variable Cost 
28%  
Estimated Monthly Fixed Cost 
$61,825  
6.4 Projected Profit and Loss 
We  project rapid  expansion  of  sales  and  profits.  Net  profits  remain 
above 16% of sales even in the most aggressive expansion period.  
Pro Forma Profit and Loss 
 
FY 1996 
FY 1997 
FY 1998 
Sales 
$2,042,444  
$9,198,000   $16,084,000  
Direct Cost of Sales 
$577,638  
$2,531,380   $4,435,640  
Other Costs of Sales 
$0  
$0  
$0  
Total Cost of Sales 
$577,638  
$2,531,380   $4,435,640  
Gross Margin 
$1,464,806  
$6,666,620   $11,648,360  
Gross Margin % 
71.72%  
72.48%  
72.42%  
Expenses 
 
 
 
Payroll 
$484,800  
$2,800,000   $4,850,000  
Marketing/Promotion 
$69,500  
$512,000  
$860,000  
Depreciation 
$69,996  
$280,000  
$320,000  
Rent 
$52,800  
$197,000  
$460,000  
Utilities 
$28,800  
$150,000  
$180,000  
Insurance 
$36,000  
$96,000  
$125,000  
Payroll Taxes 
$0  
$0  
$0  
Other 
$0  
$0  
$0  
Total Operating Expenses 
$741,896  
$4,035,000   $6,795,000  
Profit Before Interest and Taxes 
$722,910  
$2,631,620   $4,853,360  
EBITDA 
$792,906  
$2,911,620   $5,173,360  
Interest Expense 
$0  
$0  
$0  
Taxes Incurred 
$238,560  
$868,435   $1,601,609  
Net Profit 
$484,350  
$1,763,185   $3,251,751  
Net Profit/Sales 
23.71%  
19.17%  
20.22%  

 
61 
6.5 Projected Cash Flow 
We  expect  to  manage  cash  flow  with  an  additional  investment 
totaling  $1.5  to  $2  million.  All  additional  requirements  can  be  met  from 
internally  generated funds. With investment coming in during late 1996 and 
mid 1997 there is no point at which future cash flow appears to be in danger.  
6.6 Projected Balance Sheet 
As  shown  in  the  balance  sheet  in  the  table,  we  expect  a  healthy 
growth in net  worth,  from approximately $1  million at present to  more than 
$8 million by the end of the third year of operations.  
 
 
APPENDIX 2:  
 
 
Contract of Educational Services 
 
№ 56-S11    
 
 
 
Date: September 1st, 2011  
 
International  Business  School,  here  and  after  referred  to  as  the 
Employer,  represented  by  Director  General  Tamara  Ivanova,  acting  on  the 
basis of the Statutes, on the one hand, and Stanford Economics Institute, here 
and  after  referred  to  as  the  Executor  represented  by  President  Dr.  John  F. 
Steinmann,  acting  on  the  basis  of  the  Statutes,  on  the  other  hand,  both 
hereinafter referred to as ―Parties‖, have agreed to the following: 
1. 
Subject of the Contract  
1.1. The Executor hereby agrees to provide educational services and 
conduct  a  course  of  workshops  for  the  Employer  in  accordance  with  the 
terms and conditions set forth in this Contract. 
1.2. The Employer hereby agrees to pay the services provided by the 
Executor  in  accordance  with  the  terms  and  conditions  set  forth  in  this 
Contract. 
2.  Rights and Obligations of the Parties  
2.1.  The  Executor  shall  arrange  3  sessions  of  10  workshops  for 
economics students studying under the Employer‘s supervision.  
2.2. The Executor shall supply the Employer with the curriculum 30 
days before the commencement of the first session.  
2.3.  The  Executor  is  rightful  to  introduce  changes  in  the  agreed 
curriculum  during  the  abovementioned  sessions  having  received  beforehand 
the Employer‘s concord in writing.  

 
62 
2.4. The  Employer shall pay  the  Executor‘s  services in accordance 
with the invoice issued by the Executor in 10 day period after the termination 
of the last session.  
2.5.  The  Employer  is  obligated  to  provide  the  Executor‘s 
representatives  with  premises  and  equipment  necessary  for  conducting 
workshops.  
3. Price and Settlement Procedure  
The Parties agreed that the price of the Contract shall be equal to 3 
000 (three thousand) Euro. 
4. Dispute Settlement  
4.1.  Shall  any  disputes  emerge,  the  Parties  resolve  them  by 
negotiating in accordance with the terms and conditions of the Contract.  
4.2. This agreement shall be interpreted according to the laws of the 
State of Russian Federation. 
5. Force Majeure 
The  Parties  are  not  liable  for  failure  to  perform  their  obligations  if 
such  failure  is  as  a  result  of  Acts  of  God  (natural  disaster,  war,  terrorist 
activities etc.).  
 
6. Miscellaneous  
This Contract shall become effective on September 1, 2009 and shall 
continue  in  effect  until  December  30,  2009.  Either  Party  may  cancel  this 
Contract on thirty days notice to the other party in writing, by certified mail 
or personal delivery 
7. Signatures and Bank Details  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
63 
Literature 
 
Bullinger,  E.W.  Figures  of  speech  used  in  the  Bible.  Baker  Books:  Grand 
Rapids, MI., 1968. 
Corbett,  E.P.,  Connors,  R.J.  Classical  rhetoric  for  the  modern  student  (4th 
ed.). New York: Oxford University Press, 1999. 
Galperin I.R. Stylistics. 2 ed. rev. M: Higher school, 1977. 
Harris, 
R. 

handbook 
of 
rhetorical 
devices. 
2003. 
 
Lanham, R.A. A handlist of rhetorical terms (2nd ed.). Berkeley: University 
of California Press, 1991. 
Maltzev V.A. An introduction to Linguistic Poetice. Minsk: Vysh. Sh., 1980.  
Young,  G.  Silva  rhetoricae.  2003.  Brigham  Young  University  website: 
 
Арнольд И.В. Стилистика современного английского языка (стилистика 
декодирования). 2-е изд. – Л.: Просвещение, 1981.  
Вострикова  И.Ю.  Neo-rhetoric  and  stylistic  analysis  of  American  oratory 
texts: Учебное пособие. – СПб.: Изд-во СПбГУЭФ, 2009.  
Вострикова  И.Ю.,  Полякова  К.В.  Особенности  газетного  стиля  в 
английском языке: Учебное пособие. – СПб.: Изд-во СПбГУЭФ, 2009.   
Гальперин И.Р. Очерки по стилистике английского языка. – М., 1958.  
Гальперин И.Р. Текст как объект лингвистического исследования. – М., 
1981.  
Киселева Л.А. Вопросы теории речевого воздействия. – Л., 1978.  
Лосев А.Ф. История античной эстетики: Софисты. Сократ. Платон. – М., 
1969. 
Мороховский  А.Н. и  др. Стилистика  английского языка.  –  Киев: Вища 
шк., 1984.  
Наер В.Л. Функциональные стили английского языка. – М., 1981.  
Никитина  С.Е.,  Васильева  Н.В.  Экспериментальный  системный 
толковый словарь стилистических терминов. – М., 1996. 
Пелевина  Н.Ф.  Стилистический  анализ  художественного  текста.  –  Л.: 
Просвещение, 1980. 
Розенталь Д.Э. Словарь лингвистических терминов.   
Скребнев Ю.В. Очерки по теории стилистики. – Горький, 1975.  
Хазагеров Г.Г., Лобанов И.Б. Риторика. – М., 2008. 

 
64 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Учебное издание 
 
Вострикова Ирина Юрьевна 
 
Stylistics of English Language. Seminar exercises and tasks  
по дисциплине  
«Стилистика английского языка» 
 
 
Редактор О.А. Масликова 
 
Подписано в печать 29.11.11. Формат 60х84 1/16. 
Усл. печ. л. 4,0. Тираж 100 экз. Заказ 555. РТП изд-ва СПбГУЭФ. 
 
Издательство СПбГУЭФ. 191023, Санкт-Петербург, Садовая ул., д. 21. 


 

А также другие работы, которые могут Вас заинтересовать

61795. Символіка. Що це таке? 28.92 KB
  Мета: поглибити знання про символи; познайомити із різноманітністю символіки у нашому житті; поширити і збагатити знання учнів про народні символи України; виховувати повагу до символіки Батьківщини...
61796. Вік. Цифри. День народження 25.98 KB
  Мета: засвоєння нової лексики; формування вміння ставити запитання типу How old re you How old is she та відповідати на них; розширення кругозору учнів; розвиток мовної здогадки та мовленнєвої реакції учнів...
61797. Твоя країна — Україна. Символи держави 35.33 KB
  Мета: формувати уявлення про країну; ознайомити з найбільшими містами і річкам України; Розширити знання учнів про державні символи України; викохувати патріотичні почуття любов і гордість за державу.
61799. Гроші. Види та функції грошей 25.28 KB
  Мета: Узагальнити й систематизувати знання з теми, закріпити розуміння основних понять і термінів, навчити застосовувати вивчене на практиці. Розвивати абстрактно-логічне та образне мислення, інтерес до науки, проведення економічного аналізу.
61800. Школа м’яча 27.57 KB
  Руки в сторони пальці в кулак. Руки в сторони пальці в кулак. ноги разом руки до плечей. На 1 крок лівою ногою вперед руки в стороні 2 приставити ногу руки до плечей 3 нахил 4 в.
61801. Форма «рондо» 22.25 KB
  Мета: Познайомити з поняттям форма рондо з творчістю О.Бородін романс Спляча красуння Для виконання: Класне рондо В русі: В. Тип уроку: комбінований Наочно – дидактичні засоби: комп’ютер; презентація; Учень повинен знати: поняття форма рондо...