54092

My Family and Friends

Конспект урока

Педагогика и дидактика

Family life has always been a subject of research in literature. Famous writers have always described how people build their family relationships. Family life has changed a lot over the centuries, but family values have never been the subject of change. I think you agree with me that the main characteristic features of any family are love, respect, mutual understanding and tolerance.

Английский

2014-03-07

73.5 KB

2 чел.

Lesson Plan.

Unconditional Love and Family Matters.

Form 10, textbook Alla Nesvit Unit 1. Project B. Page 42.

General theme of the unit: My Family and Friends

Objectives:

Introduce speaking into a reading lesson;

Provide a real opportunity for genuine communication;

Read authentic texts and use jigsaw strategies;

Develop students’ language awareness and love to authentic literature;

Enrich students’ knowledge about family matters

Lesson Outline.

  1.  Introduction

Family life has always been a subject of research in literature. Famous writers have always described how people build their family relationships. Family life has changed a lot over the centuries, but family values have never been the subject of change. I think you agree with me that the main characteristic features of any family are love, respect, mutual understanding and tolerance. Today we are going to speak about the main feature, love. Getting ready for today’s lesson I made a little research, I tried to find the best quotation about love and found out that there are 14,958 quotes about love in the Internet and only 47 ones about unconditional love. You will ask: What is the difference? It is what we are going to figure out at our today’s lesson. So, let’s start.

2. Brainstorming activity 1.

I will give you two quotes and you will try to guess which of them is about love and which is about unconditional love.

1. Love asks me no questions,

And gives me endless support...

~ by William Shakespeare ~

2. “When you look into your mother’s eyes,

you know that is the purest love you can find on this earth.”

Mitch Albom, For One More Day

The class is split into two small subgroups. Allow 3-5 minutes to see the difference between the messages of the quotes and accomplish the given task and then ask for volunteers to report the results of their subgroups’ discussion to the class.

 

3. Brainstorming activity 2.

“Love is patient, love is kind”. What other adjectives can we use defining a term “love”? Make up a list of adjectives you associate the word “love “with.

E.g. authentic, eternal, romantic, passionate, humble, unhappy, fearful, forgiving, mutual, ideal, etc.

Approximately 5-7 minutes is given to compile a list of adjectives and then two subgroups representatives read out their ideas.

4. Jigsaw reading.

Each subgroup is given one of the two texts. The students read their texts (5-7 minutes for silent reading).


Text 1. The Praying Hands
.

Handout 1.

Below is a touching story about DURERS Praying Hands that is circulated widely.

It tells of DURER doing his creation in appreciation of a brother who went to work in the mines to support Albrecht's education.

Back in the fifteenth century, in a tiny village near Nuremberg, lived a family with eighteen children. Eighteen! In order merely to keep food on the table for this mob, the father and head of the household, a goldsmith by profession, worked almost eighteen hours a day at his trade and any other paying chore he could find in the neighbourhood. Despite their seemingly hopeless condition, two of Albrecht Durer the Elder's children had a dream. They both wanted to pursue their talent for art, but they knew full well that their father would never be financially able to send either of them to Nuremberg to study at the Academy.

After many long discussions at night in their crowded bed, the two boys finally worked out a pact. They would toss a coin. The loser would go down into the nearby mines and, with his earnings, support his brother while he attended the academy. Then, when that brother who won the toss completed his studies, in four years, he would support the other brother at the academy, either with sales of his artwork or, if necessary, also by labouring in the mines.

They tossed a coin on a Sunday morning after church. Albrecht Durer won the toss and went off to Nuremberg. Albert went down into the dangerous mines and, for the next four years, financed his brother, whose work at the academy was almost an immediate sensation. Albrecht's etchings, his woodcuts, and his oils were far better than those of most of his professors, and by the time he graduated, he was beginning to earn considerable fees for his commissioned works.

When the young artist returned to his village, the Durer family held a festive dinner on their lawn to celebrate Albrecht's triumphant homecoming. After a long and memorable meal, punctuated with music and laughter, Albrecht rose from his honoured position at the head of the table to drink a toast to his beloved brother for the years of sacrifice that had enabled Albrecht to fulfil his ambition. His closing words were, "And now, Albert, blessed brother of mine, now it is your turn. Now you can go to Nuremberg to pursue your dream, and I will take care of you."

All heads turned in eager expectation to the far end of the table where Albert sat, tears streaming down his pale face, shaking his lowered head from side to side while he sobbed and repeated, over and over, "No...no...no...no."

Finally, Albert rose and wiped the tears from his cheeks. He glanced down the long table at the faces he loved, and then, holding his hands close to his right cheek, he said softly, "No, brother. I cannot go to Nuremberg. It is too late for me. Look... look what four years in the mines have done to my hands! The bones in every finger have been smashed at least once, and lately I have been suffering from arthritis so badly in my right hand that I cannot even hold a glass to return your toast, much less make delicate lines on parchment or canvas with a pen or a brush. No, brother...

for me it is too late."

More than 450 years have passed. By now, Albrecht Durer's hundreds of masterful portraits, pen and silver-point sketches, watercolours, charcoals, woodcuts, and copper engravings hang in every great museum in the world, but the odds are great that you, like most people, are familiar with only one of Albrecht Durer's works. More than merely being familiar with it, you very well may have a reproduction hanging in your home or office.

One day, to pay homage to Albert for all that he had sacrificed, Albrecht Durer painstakingly drew his brother's abused hands with palms together and thin fingers stretched skyward. He called his powerful drawing simply "Hands," but the entire world almost immediately opened their hearts to his great masterpiece and renamed his tribute of love "The Praying Hands."

The next time you see a copy of that touching creation, take a second look. Let it be your reminder, if you still need one, that no one - no one - - ever makes it alone!

~Source Unknown~ 

Even though the story is fiction, 

I hope the intent of the story is appreciated, 

whether true or not.


Text 2. “The Ant and the Grasshopper”

by William Somerset Maugham.

Handout 2.

When I was a very small boy I was made to learn by heart certain of the fables of La Fontaine, and the moral of each was carefully explained to me. Among those I learnt was The Ant and the Grasshopper, which is devised to bring home to the young the useful lesson that in an imperfect world industry is rewarded and giddiness punished. In this admirable fable (I apologise for telling something which everyone is politely, but inexactly, supposed to know) the ant spends a laborious summer gathering its winter store; while the grasshopper sits on a blade of grass singing to the sun. Winter comes and the ant is comfortably provided for, but the grasshopper has an empty larder: he goes to the ant and begs for a little food. Then the ant gives him her classic answer:

"What were you doing in the summer time?"

"Saving your presence, I sang, I sang all day, all night."

"You sang. Why, then go and dance."

I do not ascribe it to perversity on my part, but rather to the inconsequence of childhood, which is deficient in moral sense, that I could never quite reconcile myself to the lesson. My sympathies were with the grasshopper and for some time I never saw an ant without putting my foot on it. In this summary (and, as I have discovered since, entirely human) fashion I sought to express my disapproval of prudence and commonsense.

I could not help thinking of this fable when the other day I saw George Ramsay lunching by himself in a restaurant.

I never saw anyone wear an expression of such deep gloom. He was staring into space. He looked as though the burden of the whole world sat on his shoulders. I was sorry for him: I suspected at once that his unfortunate brother had been causing trouble again. I went up to him and held out my hand.

"How are you?" I asked.

"I'm not in hilarious spirits," he answered.

"Is it Tom again?"

He sighed.

"Yes, it's Tom again."

"Why don't you chuck him?" You've done everything in the world for him. You must know by now that he's quite hopeless.

I suppose every family has a black sheep. Tom had been a sore trial for twenty years. He had begun life decently enough: he went into business, married and had two children. The Ramsays were perfectly respectable people and there was every reason to suppose that Tom Ramsay would have a useful and honourable career. But one day, without warning, he announced that he didn't like work and that he wasn't suited for marriage. He wanted to enjoy himself. He would listen to no expostulations. He left his wife and his office. He had a little money and he spent two happy years in the various capitals of Europe. Rumours of his doings reached his relations from time to time and they were profoundly shocked. He certainly had a very good time. They shook their heads and asked what would happen when his money was spent. They soon found out: he borrowed. He was charming and unscrupulous. I have never met anyone to whom it was more difficult to refuse a loan. He made a steady income from his friends and he made friends easily. But he always said that the money you spent on necessities was boring; the money that was amusing to spend was the money you spent on luxuries. For this he depended on his brother George. He did not waste his charm on him. George was a serious man and insensible to such enticements. George was respectable. Once or twice he fell to Tom's promises of amendment and gave him considerable sums in order that he might make a fresh start. On these Tom bought a motorcar and some very nice jewellery. But when circumstances forced George to realise that his brother would never settle down and he washed his hands of him, Tom, without a qualm, began to blackmail him. It was not very nice for a respectable lawyer to find his brother shaking cocktails behind he bar of his favourite restaurant or to see him waiting on the box-seat of a taxi outside his club. Tom said that to serve in a bar or to drive a taxi was a perfectly decent occupation, but if George could oblige him with a couple of hundred pounds he didn't mind for the honour of the family giving it up. George paid.

Once Tom nearly went to prison. George was terribly upset. He went into the whole discreditable affair. Really Tom had gone too far. He had been wild, thoughtless and selfish; but he had never before done anything dishonest, by which George meant illegal; and if he were prosecuted he would assuredly be convicted. But you cannot allow your only brother to go to gaol. The man Tom had cheated, a man called Crenshaw, was vindictive. He was determined to take the matter into court; he said Tom was a scoundrel and should be punished. It cost George an infinite deal of trouble and five hundred pounds to settle the affair. I have never seen him in such a rage as when he heard that Tom and Crenshaw had gone off together to Monte Carlo the moment they cashed the cheque. They spent a happy month there.

For twenty years Tom raced and gambled, philandered with the prettiest girls, danced, ate in the most expensive restaurants, and dressed beautifully. He always looked as if he had just stepped out of a bandbox. Though he was forty-six you would never have taken him for more than thirty-five. He was a most amusing companion and though you knew he was perfectly worthless you could not but enjoy his society. He had high spirits, an unfailing gaiety and incredible charm. I never grudged the contributions he regularly levied on me for the necessities of his existence. I never lent him fifty pounds without feeling that I was in his debt. Tom Ramsay knew everyone and everyone knew Tom Ramsay. You could not approve of him, but you could not help liking him.

Poor George, only a year older than his scapegrace brother, looked sixty. He had never taken more than a fortnight's holiday in the year for a quarter of a century. He was in his office every morning at nine-thirty and never left it till six. He was honest, industrious and worthy. He had a good wife, to whom he had never been unfaithful even in thought, and four daughters to whom he was the best of fathers. He made a point of saving a third of his income and his plan was to retire at fifty-five to a little house in the country where he proposed to cultivate his garden and play golf. His life was blameless. He was glad that he was growing old because Tom was growing old too. He rubbed his hands and said:

"It was all very well when Tom was young and good-looking, but he's only a year younger than I am. In four years he'll be fifty. He won't find life so easy then. I shall have thirty thousand pounds by the time I'm fifty. For twenty-five years I've said that Tom would end in the gutter. And we shall see how he likes that. We shall see if it really pays best to work or be idle."

Poor George! I sympathized with him. I wondered now as I sat down beside him what infamous thing Tom had done. George was evidently very much upset.

"Do you know what's happened now?" he asked me.

I was prepared for the worst. I wondered if Tom had got into the hands of the police at last. George could hardly bring himself to speak.

"You're not going to deny that all my life I've been hardworking, decent, respectable and straightforward. After a life of industry and thrift I can look forward to retiring on a small income in gilt-edged securities. I've always done my duty in that state of life in which it has pleased Providence to place me."

"True."

"And you can't deny that Tom has been an idle, worthless, dissolute and dishonourable rogue. If there were any justice he'd be in the workhouse."

"True."

George grew red in the face.

“A few weeks ago he became engaged to a woman old enough to be his mother. And now she's died and left him everything she had. Half a million pounds, a yacht, a house in London and a house in the country."

George Ramsay beat his clenched fist on the table.

"It's not fair, I tell you; it's not fair. Damn it, it's not fair."

I could not help it. I burst into a shout of laughter as I looked at George's wrathful face, I rolled in my chair; I very nearly fell on the floor. George never forgave me. But Tom often asked me to excellent dinners in his charming house in Mayfair, and if he occasionally borrows a trifle from me, that is merely from force of habit. It is never more than a sovereign

5. Reading comprehension tasks. 

Students do after-reading exercises.


Subgroup 1.

Handout 3.

  1.  Agree or disagree with the following statements. Say what is not right in the false sentences.
  2.  Albrecht Durer the Elder was a goldsmith.
  3.  The brothers tossed the coin on a Sunday morning before church.
  4.  Albert Durer won the coin toss.
  5.  Albrecht began to earn considerable fees for his commissioned works by the time he graduated from Nuremberg Academy.
  6.  The Durer family held a festive dinner to celebrate Albrecht’s success.
  7.  Albrecht drank a toast to his beloved brother for the five- year sacrifice.
  8.  Albert suffered from arthritis so badly that his left hand could neither write nor paint.
  9.  Albrecht fulfilled his ambition and wanted to take care of his brother.
  10.  Albrecht Durer created “Hands” to pay homage to Albert, his blessed brother.
  11.   This story is a reminder of the idea that art is eternal.
  12.  Complete the following sentences.
  13.  Back in the fifteenth century, in a tiny village near Nuremberg, lived….
  14.  Despite their seemingly hopeless condition, two of Albrecht Durer the Elder's children…..
  15.  The loser would go down into the nearby mines and…
  16.  After many long discussions at night in their crowded bed…
  17.  Albrecht's etchings, his woodcuts, and his oils were…..
  18.  After a long and memorable meal, punctuated with music and laughter, Albrecht rose….
  19.  All heads turned in eager expectation to the far end of the table….
  20.   He glanced down the long table at the faces he loved, and then…
  21.  The bones in every finger have been smashed at least once, and lately…
  22.  One day, to pay homage to Albert for all that he had sacrificed, Albrecht….
  23.  Prove that:
  24.  Durer’s “Hands” was created in appreciation of his brother who worked in the mines to support Albrecht’s education.
  25.  The two boys couldn’t pursue their talents for arts at the same time.
  26.  Their father was financially unable to send either of his sons to Nuremberg Academy.
  27.  Albrecht’s work at the Academy was almost an immediate sensation.
  28.  Albrecht loved his brother.
  29.  Albert suffered from arthritis.
  30.  Durer’s masterpieces are known all over the world.
  31.  The entire world almost immediately opened their hearts to the etching.
  32.  “Praying Hands” is a reminder to people.
  33.  Albrecht accomplished his ambition.


Subgroup 2.

Handout 4. 

  1.  Agree or disagree with the following statements. Say what is not right in the false sentences.
  2.  George Ramsay was a decent lawyer respected by his colleagues and acquaintances.
  3.  Tom Ramsay was a black sheep in his family.
  4.  George Ramsay made a steady income from his friends and he made friends easily.
  5.  Once or twice George fell to Tom's promises of amendment and gave him considerable sums in order that he might make a fresh start. On these Tom bought two motorcars and some very nice jewellery.
  6.   Tom said that to serve in a bar or to drive a taxi was a perfectly decent occupation.
  7.   For ten years Tom raced and gambled, danced, ate in the most expensive restaurants, and dressed beautifully.
  8.  The author sympathized with George Ramsay.
  9.  The author burst into a shout of laughter as he looked at George's wrathful face, he rolled in his chair; he very nearly fell on the floor.
  10.  A few weeks ago Tom became engaged to a woman young enough to be his daughter.
  11.  Tom often asked the author to excellent dinners in his charming house in Mayfair, and if Tom occasionally borrows a trifle from him, that is merely from force of habit. It is never more than a sovereign.
  12.  Complete the following sentences.
  13.  When I was a very small boy I was made to learn by heart certain of the fables of La Fontaine…
  14.   My sympathies were with the grasshopper and for some time I never saw an ant without…
  15.  The Ramsays were perfectly respectable people and there was every reason to suppose that Tom Ramsay…
  16.  He left his wife and his office. He had a little money and…
  17.  They shook their heads and asked what would happen when his money was spent. They soon found out…
  18.  Tom always looked as if he had just stepped out of a bandbox. Though he was forty-six you would never have taken him for….
  19.  The man Tom had cheated, a man called Crenshaw, was vindictive. He was determined to….
  20.  Poor George, only a year older than his scapegrace brother, looked sixty. He had never taken more than…
  21.  “A few weeks ago he became engaged to a woman old enough to be his mother. And now she's died and left him everything she had…..
  22.  George Ramsay beat his….

  1.  Prove that:
  2.  The author could not help thinking of the fable when the other day he saw George Ramsay lunching by himself in a restaurant.
  3.  George Ramsay wore an expression of deep gloom.
  4.  Tom had been a sore trial for twenty years.
  5.  He had begun life decently enough.
  6.  Tom blackmailed his decent brother.
  7.  Poor George, only a year older than his scapegrace brother, looked sixty.
  8.  George made a point of saving a third of his income and his plan was to retire at fifty-five to a little house in the country where he proposed to cultivate his garden and play golf.
  9.  George was always responsible for his brother.
  10.  Tom was much luckier and his charm was irresistible.
  11.   This story cannot be called a reminder of unconditional love.

6. Pair work.

Students then pair up with someone from the other group and tell them about their story, and listen to the other one. The main idea of this activity is to define the relationships between Durer brothers and Ramsay brothers. The students contrast their main characters and express their opinions on family relationships and unconditional love among the family members. They also make conclusions about the main characteristics of good relationships and the main role unconditional love plays in them.

7. As the home assignment the students are offered to watch two videos about unconditional love and write an essay “Unconditional Love is…”

Video 1. The Mantis Parable. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPZPxGoNnn0

Video 2. Unconditional Love. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lOZrgSEwL_w


 

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